teklis December 21, 2010, 1:39 am
So I had a question about the difference between: dakedo, kedo, and shikashi. They all mean but or however, and I was a little fuzzy on the usage of the three. I know kedo is the plain form of ga in ‘desu ga’. Dakedo seemed straight forward to me in that it was just the plain form of desu: da + informal ga: kedo. But I found ‘dakedo’ in several dictionaries along with kedo, and I became a little unsure of the difference (if there is one).

I understand that ‘kedo’ and ‘ga’ are both used to soften a sentence, or a dependant clause, but Im not too sure of the differences in usages between the three (if there even is a difference between dakedo and kedo).

Any explanation and/or examples would be greatly appreciated.


But: dakedo, kedo, and shikashi
Pascal-P December 28, 2010, 9:18 pm
I'll try and help.
1. Shikashi is use primarily in formal situations or in writing.

2. Kedo is short for keredomo. You can use it where ga could be used.
Eg.Kono kooto wa yasui desu ga shitsu ga warui.>Kono koto wa yasui desu kedo, shitsu ga warui desu.(This coat is cheap, but its quality is bad)

3. Dakedo is a contraction of dakeredomo, meaning "though/however". It's a more colloquial version of "desu kedo"
Eg. Oishii dakedo, amari kenkou ja nai. (It's delicious, however it's not very healthy)

I think that's the difference. If I'm incorrect, someone please correct me.
But: dakedo, kedo, and shikashi

Ask a question or a post a response

If you want to ask a question or post a response you need to be a member.

  • If you are already a member login here.

  • If you are not a member you can become one by taking the free Rocket Japanese trial here.

Over 1,200,000 people love Rocket Languages

Here's what Rocket Languages members have to say:

Andrei Freeman - Pennsylvania, USA


Pennsylvania, USA

Rudi Kopp - USA



Carmen Franceschino - Pennsylvania, USA


Pennsylvania, USA

Kelly Scali - Chicago, USA


Chicago, USA

Mark Waddel - Auckland, NZ


Auckland, NZ

William McGill - Florida, USA


Florida, USA

Probably the best language tool I've come across. Actually love it more than Rosetta Stone and Duolingo

Try our award-winning Japanese language software for FREE

(And see how easy it actually is to learn Japanese... even if you've tried and failed before)

As seen in The New York Times, PC Mag Editors' Choice, Trust Guard - Security Verified, Better Business Bureau, 60 Day - Money back Guarantee Better Business Bureau