Forum Rocket German Conversation in German Pronunciation of words ending in "e"

Pronunciation of words ending in "e"

Byron-K21

I'm going through the phrases in 19.3 and I am noticing a slight difference in pronunciation for some words. I don't know who the speaker is, but I'm wondering if it is a regional difference. Most of the time words ending in "e" have an "ahh" sound, e.g. kalte sounds like "call tah". However this speaker pronounces it more like "call tee". The same is true of "speise". It is not a concern. I find dialects interesting. We all have an accent whether we realize it or not. Mine is Minnesotan, although not as exagerated as what you may have heard in the movie "Fargo". That was just a little over the top. Anyway, just curious about the backgrounds of your native speakers.

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, I listened to the audio of the lesson. If you are referring to the practice section the way the last letter 'e' is pronounced in 'kalte' might be because the voice speaks the single words with accentuation. However in the north of Germany like in Hamburg, Rostock and Schwerin you can notice the letter 'e' being stretched out in words ending on 'en'. Hope that helps! Paul

Byron-K21

Thanks Paul. It was more a matter of curiosity than anything. I suppose your speakers are chosen to be as regionally neutral as possible. Still, we all retain a bit of our local accent and I have detected some differences, not that there is anything wrong with that. I don't know where you learned your English, but in the US as in the UK there are huge regional differences in pronunciation and tempo. The midwest US is considered to be the most neutral, but there are areas in the midwest, e.g. northern Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Michigan Upper Penisula where the accents of the original Norwegian, German, and Finnish immigrants are still detectable even among residents who don't speak a word of the language. I've noticed now in the Platinum section, some of the differences between German, Austrian and Swiss words are noted. Very interesting. regards, Byron

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, I started learning English in Germany with an English teacher speaking British English and later on one that was speaking American English. Although they were both Germans there was still a difference in their pronunciation which was strange at the start to get used to. It was certainly a good experience. Now my English accent might have changed through the influence of living several years in New Zealand. Liebe Grüße Paul

Byron-K21

Hi Paul, I expect, if you've been speaking more English than German for the past several years, your German accent has changed as well. I knew a German lady, many years ago, who had immigrated to the U.S. and then returned to Germany for a visit after 10 years. She said her friends and family teased her about her American accent. Beste Grüße, Byron

Ask a question or a post a response

If you want to ask a question or post a response you need to be a member.

If you are already a member login here .
If you are not a member you can become one by taking the free Rocket German trial here .