Forum Rocket German German Grammar Seitdem halte ich vom Kochen und Backen Abstand

Seitdem halte ich vom Kochen und Backen Abstand

Grant-K1

Grant-K1

Hi, I'm a confused with  "Seitdem halte ich vom Kochen und Backen Abstand".......To my knowledge, Abstand is a noun and Backen is a verb so I can't figure out why Abstand is at the end here
sfpugh

sfpugh

Seitdem halte ich vom Kochen und Backen Abstand.
Since then I keep my distance when it comes to cooking and baking.
or more literally: Since then I stay away from cooking and baking.

Abstand halten means to keep back  / stay away 

It seems to me as though it is behaving like a separable verb although in the Leo dictionary it is two words. If it is behaving like a separable verb then kicking  Abstand  to the end would be normal.

To really throw confusion into the mix, I think Kochen and Backen are functioning as nouns in the sentence. They have capital letters.

Where are the German tutors?

 
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

I'm not an expert and would appreciate hearing from the tutors as well, but I think literally the sentence is saying:  "Since then I keep distance from cooking and baking."  We wouldn't say it exactly like that in English but it seems to be correct grammar in German.  Distance, cooking, and baking are used as nouns.  
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

I guess I kind of blew by this when I first took the lesson some years ago, but to analyze it further, I think the noun Abstand (distance) is the direct object and the nouns Kochen and Backen  are indirect objects.  So, I think it's all good but it gets to a complaint I've frequently had with RG translators which is that they don't always break it out into the literal translation so that we can better understand the structure.  Some of the on line tutors like German with Jenny do a much better job at that.
Grant-K1

Grant-K1

Hey thanks guys for your input. I should make more of an effort and try to answer others questions. I like German with Jenny also Byron. Although I haven't bothered with her for a good month or so.  I do like Manuel's verb Juggling podcasts (They're on youtube as well). I was fascinated the other day when I watched an Italian polyglot video when he said that it is best to use just one method when learning a language. I might have it a little bit wrong but he did say that along those lines. I get bored easily and use around 5-6 methods.  I especially like the earphone ipod method when I'm going for a walk. I hate being in front of a damn computer for  too long. What about you guys? What do you prefer or Was ziehst du es vor?
Grant-K1

Grant-K1

Just one more thing. I still believe the best way to learn a language is to converse with a native speaker. I wish I had a German guy/gal around just to devote himself to me lol. I know you can use Italki etc but money is an issue and you get what you pay for. I learned that the hard way. Our exchange rate down here is the land of Aus is pitiful.
sfpugh

sfpugh

I think I was wrong about the position of abstand. I think it may just be following the rule that the direct object comes after the indirect object. If vom Kochen und Backen​ is considered the direct object, then abstand  should come after it.
Nehmen Sie bitte im Wartezimmer Platz  from 11.2​ seems like another example.
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

We'll have to wait for the expert I suppose.  I still think Abstand is the direct object but couldn't find definitive answers on the placement of the indirect objects relative to the direct object.

I agree with Grant that working with a native speaker is probably the best way to go.  GIs who married German brides became very fluent quite quickly.  Yes, I go back quite a few years.  I also agree that's it's easy to get bored with any one method.  I too get bored, and got bored with RG, and so played with different methods.  The on line opportunities have really improved in recent years.  There are some good intermediate readers available too.  
sfpugh

sfpugh

According to my Collins Easy Learning Grammar, the conventional word order is for the direct object to follow the indirect object except when the direct object is a pronoun. eg Ich gab es ihm.

Also the indirect object can be placed last for emphasis except when it is a pronoun, so you couldn't say Ich gab das Buch ihm.

I agree it is great to have direct access to a native German speaker but it is not always as good as it seems.  I have a German partner but she is completely bilingual and doesn't have much patience with my German efforts. It is too easy to slip back into English.  It would be better if her English wasn't so good. :)
Also as a native, she can't explain grammar because she doesn't normally have to think about it. 
Fred-C14

Fred-C14

I feel your pain sfpugh!

My native German speaker is forever saying that we should speak more German together but fails to realise that simply correcting my sentences without explaining why they were wrong really doesn't help me to improve. She can explain in great detail exactly what is wrong with my English though and then, just to rub salt into the wound, she regularly beats me at Scrabble in my own language. Fortunately for our relationship we spend fairly long periods apart!
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

:) I envy you guys' access to native speakers.

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