Forum Rocket German German Vocab Keine Ursache = You're welcome

Keine Ursache = You're welcome

RexV

RexV

Hi, 
I have seen that one of the meanings for "Keine Ursache" is "You're welcome".
Is this word fully interchangeable with "Bitte Schön"?
Best,
Rex
sfpugh

sfpugh

I would think Keine Ursache  is closer to "Never mind" , "no problem", or"not at all"
If you put keine Ursache  into Leo it gives a whole rage of meanings including "You're welcome."
Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Hi RexV und sfpugh,

Your translations “you’re welcome“, “never mind“, “no problem“, and “not at all“ can all be used to describe keine Ursache.

Bitte schön however, is more commonly used when giving or offering something to someone, like saying “here you go“ or “there you go.“. 
Bitte schön can also be said when responding to someone saying danke schön.

Viele Grüße
Julia
RexV

RexV

I can see that the word “bitte sehr” has a meaning very similar to “bitte schön” of which one is “you are welcome" according to this translator “https://dict.leo.org/”.

1. When is it more appropirate to use “bitte sehr” instead of “bitte schön”?

2. I understand that “bitte” can also be used to express “you are welcome”. When is it considered appropriate just to reply with “bitte”?

I can see that the word “gern gescheden” also has a meaning very similar to “bitte schön” of which one is “you are welcome”.

2. Is it fair to say that “gern gescheden” should be used in more formal situations? whereas “bitte sehr” and “bitte schön” both should be used in more informal situations?

4. Are there some regions in Germany where either “gern gescheden”, “bitte sehr”, “bitte schön” and “bitte” is more common than the other?

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Hallo RexV!

 

Let's have a look at your questions! 

1. Both terms are pretty much interchangeable. “Bitte sehr might be a little bit more formal and is often used by a waiter or waitress when serving food and drinks, for example.

2.Bitte” can be used as an abbreviation of “bitte sehr" or “bitte schön”. Usually you can go by what the other person has said, for example:

  • Person A: “Danke.”  → Person B: “Bitte.” 
  • A: “Danke schön” → B: “Bitte schön.”
  • A: “Danke sehr.” → B: “Bitte sehr.” (These examples can also be used the other way around, e.g. A: “Bitte” → B: “Danke.”.)

3. Yes, “gern geschehen” is slightly more formal. You can also think of it as saying “My pleasure.”.

4. All terms are pretty common in all of Germany. Usage can depend on the context, the person you're talking to, but also personal preference. 

 

Viele Grüße,

Julia

RexV

RexV

Danke Danke!

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Bitte!    

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