stammen vs. kommen

PaulS108

PaulS108

In lesson 23.4, we are introduced to the verb ‘stammen (aus)’, meaning ‘to come (from)’. In clarifying whether ‘stammen (aus)’ and ‘kommen (aus)’ are synonymous, I found an online explanation that although both mean ‘to come (from)’, ‘stammen (aus)’ means ‘to come from the land that one was born in or originally came from’, whereas ‘kommen (aus)’ means ‘to come from the land that one resides in’. 

Based on the above, if someone was born in Germany and moved to Italy later in life, and was asked where he was originally from, he would assumably reply, ‘Ich stamme aus Deutschland.’ However, if one resided in Germany and was only on vacation in Italy, and was asked where he was from (i.e. where he lives), he would reply, ‘Ich komme aus Deutschland’. 

In this course, we learned ‘kommen (aus)’ for both situations. Is the use of ‘stammen (aus)’ a more formal manner of speech? Can both verbs be used in day-to-day conversation? I would appreciate hearing your explanation of the difference in meaning or nuance between these two verbs. Thanking you in advance.

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Julia-Rocket-German-Tutor

Hallo PaulS108!

 

Yes, “stammen (aus)” und “kommen (aus)” are very similar and both translate to “come (from)”

I agree with your explanation above - “stammen (aus)” is more about your origin compared to “kommen (aus)”. There is also the noun “der Stammbaum” - “the family tree” which illustrates your origin in a way. 

 

Looking at your examples, you are absolutely right - you can definitely use those phrases in that context, however, if you prefer, it is also possible to answer both questions with “Ich komme aus Deutschland.” - “I come from Germany.” You could then go on and explain that even though you are from Germany, you live in Italy, for example: 

“Ich komme (ursprünglich) aus Deutschland, aber lebe jetzt in Italien.” - “I come from Germany (originally) but live in Italy now.”

 

Nevertheless, “stammen (aus)” is a great word to include in your vocabulary! It might be slighty more formal but can still easily be used in day-to-day conversations.

 

I hope this helps to answer your question. 

 

Viele Grüße,

Julia

 

 

 

 

PaulS108

PaulS108

Julia - 

Thank you for your lucid explanation. It was very helpful!

Viele Grüße,

Paul

 

Ask a question or a post a response

If you want to ask a question or post a response you need to be a member.

If you are already a member login here .
If you are not a member you can become one by taking the free Rocket German trial here .