Word used but never explained

Jeff--110 January 5, 2017, 3:48 pm
https://members.rocketlanguages.com/members/spanish/lessons/612/1-2-introductions-expanded

I hear the word "solo" used twice, but I never heard it mentioned before...
Word used but never explained
Dan-H24 January 5, 2017, 8:50 pm
It can be found near the end of the conversation transcript:

Sólo un poco.
Only a little.

It can be one of those tricky words. As used in this sentence it means only, as indicated in the English sentence. But it can also mean "alone," or one one's own, such as "¿Prefieres ver películas solo, o con amigos?"






 
Word used but never explained
Jeff--110 January 5, 2017, 11:15 pm
Thanks, but they are using words with no explanation that I have heard.  That seems a little odd.
Word used but never explained
Dan-H24 January 6, 2017, 12:31 am
Jeff: I think that if they put an explanation for every word that a new learner will encounter, RS would end up being a Spanish Dictionary. There are better tools for that, such as a Spanish dictionary.

Or bookmark SpanishDict.com to look up new vocab words. And then use the Anki flashcard system to help you learn what those new words stand for. Rather than the English word on the other side of the "card," use a picture that illustrates what the word stands for in Spanish. That way you are not translating the Spanish word, for example, "manzana" into "apple," then, thinking of the fruit. You see the word "manzana" and think of the fruit, not the word "apple." 

I wish I would have known this trick when I began learning Spanish, it would have made things easier...Read More
Jeff: I think that if they put an explanation for every word that a new learner will encounter, RS would end up being a Spanish Dictionary. There are better tools for that, such as a Spanish dictionary.

Or bookmark SpanishDict.com to look up new vocab words. And then use the Anki flashcard system to help you learn what those new words stand for. Rather than the English word on the other side of the "card," use a picture that illustrates what the word stands for in Spanish. That way you are not translating the Spanish word, for example, "manzana" into "apple," then, thinking of the fruit. You see the word "manzana" and think of the fruit, not the word "apple." 

I wish I would have known this trick when I began learning Spanish, it would have made things easier.

¡Feliz aprendiendo!

Dan
 
Word used but never explained
ricardo-rich January 6, 2017, 5:02 am
Hola,
Great  advice from Dan, and if I might add,  the accented "sólo" and  unaccented "solo"  convey the  difference  between the meanings.
Saludos,
Ricardo
Word used but never explained
the-hefay January 7, 2017, 2:37 pm
sólo is short for solamente and is an adverb and never ends in a.  Sometimes it is used without the accent in this form.

solo/sola is an adjective and therefore changes gender with the noun it's describing.

​In short, if it has the accent it's always an adverb.  If it ends in the letter a it's always an adjective.  If it ends in the letter o​ and doesn't have the accent then use the context to determine if it's an adverb or adjective.

​I read this on spanishdict.com:  In the past the standard spelling for this adverb was with an accent ([sólo]). Nowadays the [Real Academia Española] advises that the accented form is only required where there might otherwise be confusion with the adjective [solo].
Word used but never explained
Steven-W15 January 8, 2017, 6:50 am
I've sort of given up trying to figure out when to put the accent and when not to with "solo" - I just take it on the chin on the Write It! tests.
 
Word used but never explained
Jeff--110 January 8, 2017, 8:40 pm
Thanks.  I wish they wouldn't use words that they never introduced.
Word used but never explained

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