where to start Japanese

BrigidW

I know elementary Japanese so I don't want to start with aisatsu. where should I begin?  Do I have to start at level 1? 

夫婦茶碗

Rocket Japanese lessons build on one another—think of them collectively as the Saga of Kenny & Sayaka—so even if you're already familiar with the language I would recommend going through the early modules. Review is never a bad thing and you'll probably breeze through them quickly. If the reinforcement sections are just too easy for you, there is "Write it! Native" (requires knowledge of kanji) at the bottom of each module.

Tony-S10

I was the same as you. I learned it for two hears in high school before they discontinued the course. I topped the class for both years. When I started this course to be 100% honest I started from the beginning just to tick all the boxes. I was able to go through really fast.

I still revise some things in level 1 but not all the time. I am rotating a bit on Level 2 and 3 at the moment to get it all memorised.

BrigidW

I'm surprised to see this statement when telling students how to pronounce the "ka" series.  "The shape of your mouth should be the same because the vowels are the same."  Every vowel is actually different, right?  Ka, ki, ku ke, ko?  Only the initial consonant remains the same. Or am I reading this wrong?

ClaudiaR13

My mouth doesn't stay the same when I say the syllables.  The vowels do change as the sounds are different.  

Rindaru

Hi Brigid,
You're missing the importance of the lines straight above the one you quoted:
"Add the consonant “k” before each of these vowels.
a i u e o      ka ki ku ke ko
The shape of your mouth should be the same because the vowels are the same."

It's not comparing the sounds in the k-row to each other; it's comparing the sounds in the k-row to the corresponding sounds in the a-row. So "a" and "ka" should have the same mouth shape, because the vowels are the same. And "i" and "ki" should have the same mouth shape, because the vowels are the same (but different to the a/ka mouth shape).

Actually, I'm glad the misunderstanding came up, because reading this has given me a new way to approach my most-hated sound - hu/fu. Maybe if I try keeping the same mouth shape as the other u-sounds, it will come more naturally. Something for me to try, anyway...

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