~ki adjective

rena-patra

rena-patra

Hi konnichiwa. Shitsumon ga aru. l usually see ~i adjective turn into ~ki adjective such as atsui→atsuki / hayai→hayaki, itoshii→itoshiki/atarashii→atrarashiki etc. Well then, what does it mean?
2679

2679

Hmm, never heard of this before. Aren't you mistaking it with the transformation of an adjective into an adverb ? (~ku ending) atsui - atsuku hayai - hayaku itoshii - itoshiku atarashii - atarashiku
rena-patra

rena-patra

No, l don't make a mistake! l often see them like that. Ok then, l will give some examples again such as. ¤ itoshiki hito. ¤ atsuki tenki. ¤ atarashiki wa sore nari. etc Could you please clarify them again?
Pascal-P

Pascal-P

Odd that you should come across this. The "ki" form of adjectives is kind of antiquated, so you shouldn't be seeing them in any modern media, outside of a few dialects. You're not really expected to use it. This form is used often for literary effect, in songs, and always precedes a noun. I think some verbs have a similar form, but again, it's archaic. (The only reason I know this is that another example, "Subarashiki sekai", was a video game I played recently.) Could you tell me where you found these verbs? The context might explain why this form is being used.
rena-patra

rena-patra

Pascal san you are right! l found that in the lyrics.OK well here they are. SHA LA LA 愛しきひと あなたもみえているの まばゆい 月が そっと 明日を照らして強く 強く 輝いて. http://www.animelyrics.com/anime/shippuuden/hotarunohikari.txt How is it?
2679

2679

面白い!J-Rockけっこう聞くけど、今までそれを意識しなかった:D Quite interesting, I didn't realize about it up untill now although I listen to j-rock from time to time :D. Maybe it's not that used in this kind of music :D. But what does this ~ki ending actually do from a grammatical point of view ?
rena-patra

rena-patra

コッド san the same meaning. l already know the form they are classical japanese adjective but japanese people don't use them in daily conversation you see them in literature, poem or lyrics or titles of songs.
Pascal-P

Pascal-P

Like I said, they're used just like normal -i adjectives, but always precede a noun. i.e. you're never going to see "Shiken wa subarashiki" but "Subarahsiki shiken". Of course, you shouldn't really be seeing them at all, since they're antiquated outside of fancy literature and songs.
rena-patra

rena-patra

Yes, that's right! Now, l've got question for all. What's the difference between the adjectival nominalizers ~さ and ~み such as 悲しみ and 悲しさ, etc?
Pascal-P

Pascal-P

-sa can be used for any -i or -na adjective. -mi is used for a few -i adjectives, usually of emotion, to make a distinct noun. eg. you can have both "tanoshisa" and "tanoshimi", but only "fukasa", not "fukami", since "tanoshii" is emotive, while "fukai" isn't. Again, it's not all emotion adjectives, just a few. I think some ones like "nigami" are used too, since they're to do with the senses.
rena-patra

rena-patra

Wow, what a great explanation! Pascal san two thumbs up for your clarification. it's all clear! Arigatou gozaimashita.
2679

2679

わかりました! Pascal-san, you never stop amazing me with your clear explanations ! Thank you both for clarifying.
Pascal-P

Pascal-P

No problem!

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