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Forum Rocket Japanese Japanese Grammar moratte mo ii and te kuremasen

moratte mo ii and te kuremasen

tomcat

tomcat

I'm confused....could someone tell me what the difference is in these two sentences... Mado o akete moratte mo ii desu ka Mado o akete kuremasen ka Aren't they both asking the same thing?.....asking if someone could open the window for you? I know there is a logical explanation for it, but I don't see it right now. Thanks!
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Tomcat-san, Konnichiwa! *Mado o akete moratte mo ii desu ka* _AND_ *Mado o akete kuremasen ka* are indeed asking the same question. However, there is a distinction that can be made. Let's take a step back and look at these two sentences: *Mado o akete kuremasen ka* *Mado o akete moraemasu ka* :arrow: Spoken as a question, *~te kureru?* or its negative form *~te kurenai?* makes a request like _"Could/would/won't you [please do the action]?"_ For even greater politeness *~te kuremasu?* or *~te kuremasen?* or *~te kuremasenka?* is used ( :idea: as in our sentence: *Mado o akete kuremasen ka* = _"Won't you please open the window?"_). :arrow: Now onto the second sentence: *Mado o akete moraemasu ka* - note that the verb *morau* is in it's potential form. Using a polite "Can" form of *~te morau* as a question = *~te moraemasu ka?* makes a polite request. In English, it expresses "Could I/might I/might I not ask you to [do the action]?". In many contexts, *~te morau/moraimasu* is effectively the same as *~te kureru/~te kuremasu* :arrow: Now let's take a look at what other components are in : *Mado o akete moratte mo ii desu ka* The ending *~te mo ii desu ka?* asks for permission to do the action. Such as, *Tabete mo ii desu ka?* _("May I eat?")_ Following a *~te morau* expression with *~te mo ii desu ka* makes a very polite request for permission to do the action. So, *Mado o akete moratte mo ii desu ka* suggests _"May you perhaps allow me to ask you to open the window for me?"_ :shock: -Hope it's not too confusing! That last sentence simply adds more politeness - remember that the longer the sentence in Japanese - most probably it is more polite. :P
tomcat

tomcat

Sayaka-san, wakarimashita! This makes a lot of sense now. arigato gozaimashita! Cathy (Tomcat)
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

You are very welcome! Dou itashimashite! :P
CatPanda

CatPanda

さやかさん、 わたしも、どうも! デレック Attempted meaning: Sayaka, I too am thankful (for the explanation). Derek

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