Shigoto ni Nihonego

Keekiri

Keekiri

I'm very excited about my new job! I've been hired as a hostess at a hibachi style Japanese restaurant, and I was so happy about the oppertunity that while I was being interviewed, my heart was going at a pace I don't know it to commonly aquire. Basically, I haven't been that up-tight for as long as I can remember. (Can you blame me? I've been looking for a job for a half year, any job, and now I find this one that seems perfect!) Anyway, I wanted to make a lasting impression on my prospective (now current) employer, so I threw in to the conversation when we sat down: "Kore no restoran wa kire desu yo." He blinked, leaned closer and after a pause said, "What?" I had already heard him speaking fluent Japanese on the phone. is "kore no" the appropriate grammer for the situation? (was trying to say "this restaurant is beautiful." After I took a breath and repeated the phrase, he did thank me but I wondered suddenly if I had accidently said that his restaurant was very yellow... I'm still not sure...
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Keekiri-san, Congratulations!! _Omedeto gozaimasu!_ for you new job. It sounds like you landed yourself in one that fits you perfectly - and that's the best kind of job one could have. :P _Yokatta desu ne._ Now, concerning your question... *"Ko__re__ no restoran wa kire desu yo." * - is 90% correct - except for the *re* in *ko__re__*. The correct version would be: *"__Kono__ restoran wa kire desu yo." * :idea: First - Here's a brief lesson on *_Kore_* and *_Kono_* :idea: :arrow: *_Kore_* corresponds to the pronouns "this" or "these" and refer to an OBJECT or OBJECTS close at hand. In the same category, we have: *_Sore_* → corresponds to pronouns _"that"_ or _"those"_ and refers to concrete objects that is at a distance from the speaker but close to the listener. It is also used to refer to abstract things (ideas and actions). *_Are_* → translates into English as _"that over there"_ or _"those over there"_ - objects away from both the speaker and listener. *_Dore_* → this corresponds to "which?" or "which one(s)?" and is used when there are 3 or more choices to choose from. All of the above pronouns *_Kore_*, *_Sore_*, *_Are_*, and *_Dore_* can be used on its own. So think of them as stand alone pronouns. :arrow: *_Kono_* on the other hand CANNOT stand alone. It is a modifier that can only be used together with a noun. So it literally implies "this ~ (thing, one, etc)" or "these ~ (things, ones)" Ok, now that you're a bit familiar with *_Kono_* and *_Kore_*, let's go back to your original statement. :arrow: *"Ko__re__ no restoran wa kire desu yo." * - See that you placed the particle *__no__* between the pronoun *_Kore_* ("this") and the noun _*restoran*_ (restaurant). The particle *__no__* between two nouns makes the first into a modifier of the second - when the first noun is a personal name or a pronoun, it describes the next mentioned noun (i.e. _restaurant_) as belonging to that pronoun - that is, it indicates possession. :idea: *"Ko__re__ no restoran"* therefore doesn't make much sense - as it implies _"A restaurant owned by this"_ or _"A restaurant OF this"_ - where _*no*_ is the equivalent to "of". You could say *"Watashi no restoran."* → _"My restaurant"_ or *"Anata no restoran."* → _"Your restaurant."_ Have a fantastic day at work! - Sayaka :lol:
Keekiri

Keekiri

Domo arigato... hounto. I had really been struggling between koko and kore, your explanation clears it up considerably. Now if I could just recall if I had the presents of mind at the moment to say "kire" and not trip up by saying "kirin"! I'm still baffled that I got so flustered, it's really not like me. Anyway, now I just have to speed up what comprehension I have so I can understand the cooks when they start going on, and I already know what I'll say to our customers... "Irasshai mase! Welcome to Arigato, we hope you enjoy your experience tonight. How many? Alright, dozo! Right this way!" PS I like all those little smilies you guys use... I think I'll start using the 'lil buggers too. 8)
CatPanda

CatPanda

[quo]*Quote from * Keekiri Domo arigato... hounto. I had really been struggling between koko and kore, your explanation clears it up considerably. Now if I could just recall if I had the presents of mind at the moment to say "kire" and not trip up by saying "kirin"! I'm still baffled that I got so flustered, it's really not like me. Anyway, now I just have to speed up what comprehension I have so I can understand the cooks when they start going on, and I already know what I'll say to our customers... "Irasshai mase! Welcome to Arigato, we hope you enjoy your experience tonight. How many? Alright, dozo! Right this way!" PS I like all those little smilies you guys use... I think I'll start using the 'lil buggers too. 8)[/quo] Better yet: "Irrashai mase! Yokoso de Arigato, Yoroshiku onegai itsahimasu! Nan de sama imasu ka? Yosh! Dozo! Kochira ikimashou o kudasai!" I'm 95% sure that would be your entire sentence in Japanese... それても (さやかーさんは私のグラマー to correct をください。)
CatPanda

CatPanda

"Irrashai mase! Yokoso de Arigato, Yoroshiku onegai itsahimasu! Nan de sama imasu ka? Yosh! Dozo! Kochira ikimashou o kudasai!" Quick thing I saw: irasshaimasse! Yokosou de Arigatou, Yoroshiku onegai itashimasu! Nan de sama itashimasu ka? Sou desu, Dozo kochira wa irasshaimasu!
Keekiri

Keekiri

But... I'm in America. They will have no idea what I'm talking about, and this is a bustling place.
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Keekiri san - and Derek-san, First, Derek-san, it's great that you challenge yourself to translate every word, phrase, expression... whatever comes along your way! *Subarashī!* :P Yes, Keekiri-san - I assume that being in America, and in a busy restaurant, you won't get much chance to speak Japanese, but it's always a PLUS for you to be in a "Japanese" atmosphere. :idea: And... On a 'not-so-busy' day at work, you can try out these phrases -and impress both the Japanese and American customers! *Irasshai mase!* _"Welcome!"_ *Nan mē sama desu ka?* _"How many people?"_ or more politely... *Nan mē sama deshō ka?* *Ofutari sama desu ka?* _"Are there two of you?"_ *Kochira e dōzo!* _"This way, please!" / "Follow me, please."_ *Goyukkuri dōzo.* Literally: _"Please take your time."_ Meaning: _"Enjoy your dinner"_ *Gochūmon wa yoroshī-deshō-ka?* _"May I take your order?"_ *Shōshō omachi kudasai.* _"Please wait a moment."_ Oh, and you'll need this one if you're serving something hot! :evil: *Atsui node gochūi kudasai.* _"Be very careful it's very hot."_ Finally, here's how you can say_ "Here's you bill"_: *Kochira ga okanjyō desu.* One more - you'd better know how to say _"Please come back again!"_ which is: *Mata no okoshi o omachi shite imasu.* - Sayaka :P
CatPanda

CatPanda

Keekiri: Yeah you're right so yeah, I wouldn't actually do that. I was more just trying to translate something just for fun :D The Phrases Sayaka mentions though should definitely be useful if you want to give your guests an exotic Japanese feel to the restaurant and some you might thoroughly impress and get better tips from so yeah, it'd be worth a shot but as you said just take caution. Sayaka: Tyvm for the positive support! デレック

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