Forum Rocket Japanese Japanese Grammar "Where are you from" and other things

"Where are you from" and other things

K73SK

K73SK

Why are there two different ways to say "Where are you from?" Can someone give me the exact meanings to the following? Anata no shusshin wa doko desuka? doko kara kimashita ka? I know that doko means "where" kara means "from"...I never really thought of what "kimashita" meant, I just thought it built the sentence together... What's "shusshin" mean? :] ------------------------------------------------------ Anata no jyūsho -wa nan desuka? / -o oshiete kudasai does the first one mean "what is your address?" and the second one mean "could I have your address?" If any more questions about grammer, I'll post in this thread. Thanks
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Hello! Konnichiwa! :arrow: There are various ways to ask the question "Where are you from" in Japanese. The straightforward version is... *Doko kara kimashita ka? * where *Doko* _"Where"_ *Kara* _"From"_ *Kimashita* _"You came" _ (***Kimashita* is the past polite equivalent of *Kuru* "to come") *ka* "?" (question particle) On the other hand, *Anata no shusshin wa doko desuka?* is a longer, more specific question which literally asks _"You-Hometown-Where-Is-It?"_ or more naturally, _"Where is your hometown?"_ *Shusshin * usually refers to the place where one was born; one's native place; one's hometown. :idea: However, it can also refer to the university you graduated. *Dono daigaku no shusshin desu ka?* asks _"Which university did you graduate from?"_
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

:P Here is an explanation of the next set of sentences... You are correct! The first question.. *Anata no jyūsho wa nan desuka?* asks straightforwardly, _"What is your address?"_ where *jyūsho* is the word for _"address"_ and *nan desuka?* asks _"what is?"_ The second phrase is actually not a question, but a statement: *Anata no jyūsho o oshiete kudasai* *Anata no jyūsho* part is the same as the first one meaning _"Your address"_, however *oshiete kudasai* is translated as _"Please tell me"_ or _"Please teach me"_. (In this context, the first translation applies) *Oshiete* is the Te-form of the verb *Oshieru* _"to teach"_ or _"to tell" _. _Gambatte kudasai!_ :lol:
K73SK

K73SK

Ok, I had a feeling that was the deal with the second one. As for the first, thanks for clarrifying that! Domo! :]
K73SK

K73SK

More about grammar Newsletter lesson 10: (one from lesson 8&9) [code:3cbrgvyl] What is the literal meaning for "sorewa" and "okinodokuni?" It throws me off on the difference sentences it works for :?:[/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]On "How old are you?" What is the difference between the two phrases, "Anata wa o ikutsu desuka?" and "Anata wa nansai desuka?"[/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]What's the difference in "nan desuka" and "itsu desuka"...is one for a certain point of time?[/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]Why do some questions switch from "wa" and "no?" I know no means of, but it is also kind of throwing me off with some of the questions... :[[/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]is nan-nin basically "how many?"...does this mean ikura desuka is for money only? :][/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]is go kyoodai actually one word? I don't see it used in "do you have children" sentence, so I'm just assuming this...but I'm pretty sure go is a particle...? :S[/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]in front of "do you have children," it has "anata ni wa" in parenthesis... does this mean I could use it for "do you have siblings" to? :][/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]Is the literal translation for " kekkon shite imasuka?" actually "did you have marriage?" :?: [/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]For the Following three : What is your telephone number? Anata no denwa bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your cell phone number? Anata no keitai bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your passport number? Anata no ryoken bangō wa nanban desuka ? The all have "number" and "what is your" in the sentences, but in japanese, they all have "anato no" (assuming that is "your"), "bango" (?), and "nanban" (?). could someone define the ones with ? next to them... [/code:3cbrgvyl] [code:3cbrgvyl]The following : I’m from [country name]. Watashi wa [country name] kara kimashita. Would it make sense to say "Watashi no shusshin wa Amerika desu?"[/code:3cbrgvyl] How would you literally say the year 1989? Do you say it like "one thousand" (whatever 1,000 is in nihongo) or can you say, like in English, ju-kyu hachi-ju-kyu
K73SK

K73SK

More about grammar Newsletter lesson 10: (one from lesson 8&9) :!: LOTS OF QUESTIONS :!: If you want to answer certain sections on different days, that is fine, I totally understand, :lol: I am a big questionnaire! [code:252u49p2] What is the literal meaning for "sorewa" and "okinodokuni?" It throws me off on the difference sentences it works for :?:[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]On "How old are you?" What is the difference between the two phrases, "Anata wa o ikutsu desuka?" and "Anata wa nansai desuka?"[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]What's the difference in "nan desuka" and "itsu desuka"...is one for a certain point of time?[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]Why do some questions switch from "wa" and "no?" I know no means of, but it is also kind of throwing me off with some of the questions... :[[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]is nan-nin basically "how many?"...does this mean ikura desuka is for money only? :][/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]is go kyoodai actually one word? I don't see it used in "do you have children" sentence, so I'm just assuming this...but I'm pretty sure go is a particle...? :S[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]in front of "do you have children," it has "anata ni wa" in parenthesis... does this mean I could use it for "do you have siblings" to? :][/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]Is the literal translation for " kekkon shite imasuka?" actually "did you have marriage?" :?: [/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]What is the literal meaning for nanban? I cannot find the word that matches in the sentences.. [/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]The following : I’m from [country name]. Watashi wa [country name] kara kimashita. Would it make sense to say "Watashi no shusshin wa Amerika desu?"[/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]How would you literally say the year 1989? Do you say it like "one thousand" (whatever 1,000 is in nihongo) or can you say, like in English, ju-kyu hachi-ju-kyu? .....and on the date, what's difference in ka/nichi? :][/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]What's the difference for the yeses of "hai" and "ee" :][/code:252u49p2] [code:252u49p2]Why is kosan in the question for children, but kodomo is in the answer? What's the difference?[/code:252u49p2]
CatPanda

CatPanda

I'd help on answering some of these... すみません。。。 But I haven't even STARTED on the Premium Plus content.... Reason being I'm reviewing Premium just to make sure it is thoroughly in my head... and on top of that the beta testing of "stuff" is a time consumer too. それではまたじかい、 デレック
K73SK

K73SK

Actually it's the normal course :p It's just those free newsletters that you get in the e-mail's :D
CatPanda

CatPanda

xD phail! But again its grammar lessons... I only have completed the audio lessons of the First installment of RJ. As far as grammar lessons go (and bonus audio) I've just completed 3.10... Although those free ones that I got by e-mail I didn't really have the time to read and thus didn't xD... Plus the majority of them are pretty much similar to whats covered in the ones that are not via e-mail anyways. ーデレック
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Konnichiwa! K73SK-san, here the answers to your first lot of questions... :idea: *1. What is the literal meaning for "sorewa" and "okinodokuni?" * :arrow: _Sorewa_ literally means "That-is" as in, _Sorewa sugoi_ -"That is great." _Okinodokuni_ literally is the honorific prefix _O_ plus _kinodoku_ which means "pitiful" "unfortunate" and the particle _Ni_ which functions to make adjectives into adverb forms, such as adding "LY" for "Unfortunately". _Okinodokuni_ is actually used as a set phrase to show sympathy and say "I'm sorry [that is happened]" or "It's too bad [that happened]" :idea: *2. On "How old are you?" What is the difference between the two phrases, "Anata wa o ikutsu desuka?" and "Anata wa nansai desuka?"* :arrow: The above two questions translates the same - however the term _Ikutsu_ is often used to ask little kids, and is thus more informal than _nansai_ which sounds a bit rigid. :idea: *3. What's the difference in "nan desuka" and "itsu desuka"...is one for a certain point of time?* :arrow: _Nan desu ka?_ asks "What is it?" while _Itsu desu ka?_ asks "WHEN is it?" :idea: *4. Why do some questions switch from "wa" and "no?" I know no means of, but it is also kind of throwing me off with some of the questions…* :arrow: *5. is nan-nin basically "how many?"...does this mean ikura desuka is for money only?* *6. is go kyoodai actually one word? I don't see it used in "do you have children" sentence, so I'm just assuming this...but I'm pretty sure go is a particle...?* *7. in front of "do you have children," it has "anata ni wa" in parenthesis... does this mean I could use it for "do you have siblings" to? * *8. Is the literal translation for " kekkon shite imasuka?" actually "did you have marriage?" * 9. For the Following three : What is your telephone number? Anata no denwa bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your cell phone number? Anata no keitai bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your passport number? Anata no ryoken bangō wa nanban desuka ? *The all have "number" and "what is your" in the sentences, but in japanese, they all have "anato no" (assuming that is "your"), "bango" (?), and "nanban" (?). could someone define the ones with ? next to them...* *10: The following : I’m from [country name]. Watashi wa [country name] kara kimashita. Would it make sense to say "Watashi no shusshin wa Amerika desu?"* *11. How would you literally say the year 1989? Do you say it like "one thousand" (whatever 1,000 is in nihongo) or can you say, like in English, ju-kyu hachi-ju-kyu*
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

[quo]*Quote from * Sayaka Konnichiwa! K73SK-san, here the answers to your first lot of questions... :idea: *1. What is the literal meaning for "sorewa" and "okinodokuni?" * :arrow: _Sorewa_ literally means "That-is" as in, _Sorewa sugoi_ -"That is great." _Okinodokuni_ literally is the honorific prefix _O_ plus _kinodoku_ which means "pitiful" "unfortunate" and the particle _Ni_ which functions to make adjectives into adverb forms, such as adding "LY" for "Unfortunately". _Okinodokuni_ is actually used as a set phrase to show sympathy and say "I'm sorry [that is happened]" or "It's too bad [that happened]" :idea: *2. On "How old are you?" What is the difference between the two phrases, "Anata wa o ikutsu desuka?" and "Anata wa nansai desuka?"* :arrow: The above two questions translates the same - however the term _Ikutsu_ is often used to ask little kids, and is thus more informal than _nansai_ which sounds a bit rigid. :idea: *3. What's the difference in "nan desuka" and "itsu desuka"...is one for a certain point of time?* :arrow: _Nan desu ka?_ asks "What is it?" while _Itsu desu ka?_ asks "WHEN is it?" :idea: *4. Why do some questions switch from "wa" and "no?" I know no means of, but it is also kind of throwing me off with some of the questions…* :arrow: The particle _WA_ is used to state a topic. When the topic stands alone with the particle WA tacked on - it is usually a questions - made by raising the intonation on _Wa_. _Wa_ is thus used for a topic-only question, allowing you to ask the nature of the topic when the question is obvious. Such as _Go-hūmon wa?_ "As for you order?" :arrow: The particle _NO_ with a rising intonation can also be used to ask a question. _Dō shita no?_ "What is the matter?" *5. is nan-nin basically "how many?"...does this mean ikura desuka is for money only?* :arrow: Yes, Nan-nin specifically asks "How many PEOPLE" where _NIN_ is the counter for people. _Ikura_ asks "How much" and is specific to money. *6. is go kyoodai actually one word? * :arrow: _Go kyōdai_ is composed of the honorific prefix _GO_ and _kyōdai_ which means "siblings". The entire term _Go kyōdai_ is used when referring to siblings who are not your own, or of your own family - it is used to sound polite and respectful. *7. in front of "do you have children," it has "anata ni wa" in parenthesis... does this mean I could use it for "do you have siblings" to? * :arrow: Yes, you can say, _Anata ni wa gokyōdai wa imasuka?_ which is entirely correct. However, Japanese people tend to drop what is already understood, in this case _Anata ni wa_, and you can just ask _gokyōdai wa imasuka?_ *8. Is the literal translation for " kekkon shite imasuka?" actually "did you have marriage?" * :arrow: The literal translation for the above would be "marriage-are you doing?" However, in a more natural translation, it means "Are you married" as in "Are you [doing the marriage]?" *9. For the Following three : What is your telephone number? Anata no denwa bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your cell phone number? Anata no keitai bangō wa nanban desuka? What is your passport number? Anata no ryoken bangō wa nanban desuka ?* *The all have "number" and "what is your" in the sentences, but in japanese, they all have "anato no" (assuming that is "your"), "bango" (?), and "nanban" (?). could someone define the ones with ? next to them...* :arrow: _Bango_ means "number" and _Nanban_ means "what number" where _~ban_ is the counter for numbers. *10: The following : I’m from [country name]. Watashi wa [country name] kara kimashita. Would it make sense to say "Watashi no shusshin wa Amerika desu?"* :arrow: Yes, _Watashi no shusshin wa Amerika desu_ is another way to say where you are from. *11. How would you literally say the year 1989? Do you say it like "one thousand" (whatever 1,000 is in nihongo) or can you say, like in English, ju-kyu hachi-ju-kyu*[/quo] :arrow: No, you can not say _ju-kyu hachi-ju-kyu_ as in English. The correct way is: _Sen kyū hyaku hachi jū kyū_
K73SK

K73SK

Domo Arigato Gozaimasu sensei! :P There are two posts which are exactly the same. I tried reporting the first one cause it didn't have a "delete" option. The second one is the same post, just with two extra questions. But thanks again for the help on all those questions, it all makes more sense now! :)
Sayaka-Matsuura

Sayaka-Matsuura

Konnichiwa! Here are the answers to your 2 last questions... 1. What's the difference for the yeses of "hai" and "ee" There are many ways to say "yes" in Japanese... and it can be a bit confusing for sure :roll: :idea: *Hai* - is the formal way to expresse agreement, and implies closely to the English expressions "right" or "correct". However, *Hai* doesn't always express the affirmative "yes". For example, someone could say, * Hai, nai desu.* which literally translates as "Yes, I don't have it" - but more naturally means "No, I don't have it". *Hai* can also be used to say "Here" when handing something to someone, such as *Hai, kore ageru*, "Here, I give you this". It is also used as a response to a roll call. :idea: *Ee* - The casual version of *Hai* is *Ee*. So this one closely relates to the English expressions: "Yeah" "Right" "Uh-huh". :idea: *Un* - is less formal than *Hai* and *Ee* and is only used between close friends and family. :idea: Other ways to express "yes" are... _*Sō, Aa, Haa *_ 2. Why is kosan in the question for children, but kodomo is in the answer? What's the difference? :idea: Japanese has two main sets of terms for addressing or referring to family members. When speaking to someone outside your own family and asking about their children, you use *okosan* or even more politely *okosama*. When speaking about your own family, referring to your own children, you use the other set, also called the "neutral set" - which is *kodomo* :lol: Sayaka
K73SK

K73SK

Thanks a lot for all the support and feedback. There is much for me to learn! :]
CatPanda

CatPanda

さやかさん、すごい! That was a lot of questions to answer, xD! ーじゃね デレック

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