Harta -

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Porque hay harta gente que no he visto en mucho tiempo.    I tried googling the word harta and I am not successful in finding the translation. RS translate it as tons or in Romania translate as sick.   

Robert-C7

Robert-C7

What I found is that hartar means to (1) put off (disgust) and (2) turn off (disgust).  In this sentence fragment it seems to mean sick, as in "because there are sick people I have not seen in a while".  Common uses appear to be:

estar harto - have enough (interest), to be fed up (interest)
estar harto de - be sick and tired of

estoy harto de este comida - I'm sick of this food

Dan-H24

Dan-H24

Bing translator, which of course I take with a grain of salt, returns "Because there are fed up with people I haven't seen in a long time."

My Barron's Spanish/English dictionary gives one meaning of
tengo hartas razones I have plenty of reasons

So it could be something like, "Because there are plenty of people I haven't seen in a long time."

Do you have any other text that could put this sentence into context?

ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola a todos,

http://www.spanish-only.com/2009/01/spanish-word-day-harto/

http://www.mexicoguru.com/mexican-slang-meaning.php?date=090503

Saludos,

 

Ricardo

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

RS actually translate it as tons of people

Daryl-O1

Daryl-O1

Google translate translates it as 'satiate' which seems similar to have enough or fed-up or having tons of something.

it translates the line as  "Because there are sick people I have not seen in a while"

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

I need to ask my bible study friends who are mostly latinas

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Maria is here right now. Ella es de San Salvador.and she thinks it means "fed up"

ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola amigos,

I could not get the spanish-only-word-day-harto/ to be a link and pasting it into a search comes up with an error message. That may be my lack of computer skills .¡Lo siento! If you search harto  you can find the spanish- only info which is similar to the mexicoguro link..This is also discussed on the wordreference forum,  which is as always, almost entirely in Spanish. In any case, in "Porque hay harta gente..." it's not a conjugation of hartar it's an adjective. I think I came across this recently being used in LightSpeed or some where. The adventure and the pursuit of Spanish continues.

 

Saludos,

Ricardo

Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Thanks for taking the time to explain this, Ricardo. I came up with the same using "harto", although the context was that of an adverb, not an adjective (tiene una visión harto complicada de las cosas - adv. c. bastante o demasiado). Given that this is Mexican slang, it's not surprising that someone not from Mexico would only understand the more standard usage of the word (adj. Satisfecho, lleno: está harto de comer. Cansado, fastidiado: está harto de estudiar).

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Tons (harto) of discussions about a modifier that I personally would ever use again. Thanks everyone especially for taking the time to research this particular word. I am not sure if we are better having been exposed to the word "harto"

SG1

SG1

yeah disgusted, sick

Steven-W15

Steven-W15

I can see the upside of exceptionally learning a slang word like "harta". A couple of weeks ago, there was a day on the Rocket site where all the forums were accessible. I was curious and went over to the French one and the first thing I saw was "tête de turc" ("cabezón" in Spanish) - and that would sound humorous coming from someone learning the language. Those kinds of "ins" can make language learning encounters fun.

Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Hola!,

One question, where did you got that phrase from?. I mean, if I am not wrong, this is not part of the Rocket Spanish course, or is ist?....why am I asking all these questions?...let me explain!.

 

Harto, harta, is (most of the time) disgusted, sick of or when you had enough or too much of someone or something...AND HERE IS WHERE SLANG PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE...In Mexico(and I think also Colombia) they use it to describe...a high amount, quantity or excess of something...so in this case,"Hay harta gente...means, there is A LOT of people (or tons of people!, a bunch of people) who I haven't seen in many years!...

 

I hope this helps!

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Yes. Thanks Christian. It came from Rocket Spanish, the third lesson I think in the Platinum.

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