Un Juego

Jugamos un juego ... yo escribiró dos palabras que para mí son dificiles aprender de memoria y por qué. Vosotros hacéis el mismo y no se puede repetir las palabras. OK .. *sin embargo*: it means 'never the less, all the same or however' but looks like it should mean without an embargo! y *descansar* = rest, repose. I can't think of a mnemonic to remember this, the cansar part reminds me of Italian, cantare, which means to sing ..so that just confuses me further. Y ahora toca a vosotros....
Mariposa

Mariposa

Disculpemí, olvido siempre "login" :roll: Fui yo, sobra...
nohablo

nohablo

Hola, Mariposa. ¡Que buena idea! "Sin embargo" es muy difícil para mí, tambien. Aquí son dos más: *tener ganas de* - to feel like (e.g., tengo ganas de llorar - I feel like crying). I keep thinking it has something to do with winning. *extrañar* - even my paperback dictionary has such different meanings, and none of them stick with me: to banish, exile; to surprise; to miss. The can remember "banish, exile," but that's not the way I've heard/seen it used. Mostly, I've heard/seen it used to mean "miss."
nohablo

nohablo

¡Ay! Escribí (escribía?) "The can remember," pero quise (quería?) decir "I can remember." :roll:

Buenos días Mariposa, Siendo como esto es un intercambio de aprendizaje. Oro que no estoy andando ningún pasado mi línea, y si soy, yo me disculpo, pero yo pienso que la frase debe leer: Yo escribo dos palabras que son difícil para mí memorizar. Usted copia lo que yo hago, pero usted no puede usar las mismas palabras. De nuevo, yo me disculpo si yo estoy siendo a crítico. Por favor, sólo tome esto para lo que vale la pena. Yo podría estar totalmente equivocado. Volveré después con mis palabras. Vaya con Dios, mi amiga
nohablo

nohablo

Hola Mark. Por favor, ¿puedes explicar por qué tú has cambiado "escribiró" a "escribio" en el mensaje de Mariposa? El tiempo futuro me parece mejor, aunque creo que "escribiró" sería "escribiré." (Tal vez estoy equivocada. Conosco solamente un poco de español.) Tambien, ¿es "aprender de memoria" incorrecta? En inglés, "to learn by heart" y "to memorize" son muy parecidas. Gracias por adelantado por tu ayuda.
Mark3

Mark3

Hola Nohablo, Even though this is a Spanish conversation, I've decided to write this in English so I don't mess up. I suggested the change for two reasons: The first is the word "escribiró” doesn’t appear to be a word. I believe the future conjugation is “escribiré” . The second reason being that, she wrote the two words at the same time that her suggestion is taking place which brings the statement into the present tense. To “learn by heart” is a perfectly acceptable phrase, it is however an idiom. It may or may not be understood by the listener. I’ve found it is better to stay away from them in other languages as they may translate into something other than what you meant. Remember, what I’ve said are merely my thoughts and suggestions and does not mean that I’m correct. Vaya con Dios , mi amigo [/code][/i]
Randy1

Randy1

Los mios, *disponible* -- available. Something in my mind make me always want to say dispon*s*ible. Sort of like 'responsible' I guess. *llevar/llegar/levantar *-- I sometimes get confused as to whether I'm arriving, carrying, lifting, or wearing something. I have to watch these very carefully. Close relatives are llover/llorar; this may not be so bad, they're both a form of precipitation, eh ;-) Randy
nohablo

nohablo

Hola Mark. Muchas gracias por tu repuesta. I think I'll follow your example and switch to English. I don't think I have sufficient command of Spanish to be able to say what I want in this case. I agree that the correct future tense is "escribiré" rather than "escribiró." However, I continue to think that the future tense works better here than the present. It sounds very awkward to me for someone to propose to do something by saying "I write two words." I would expect her to say "I will write two words." That's why I think the future tense works best here. You make an excellent point about the danger of translating idioms literally. In this case, though, my dictionary says that "de memoria" means "by heart," so perhaps this idiom does work the same way in both languages. Again, muchas gracias.
Mariposa

Mariposa

Randy, soy de acuerdo con levantar, llevar, llegar... Y tambien: *subir* = to rise, ascend. But I keep thinking of SUBway, to go down y *salir* = exit, leave. In Italian, salire = to go up ... so for me, confusion :roll:
nohablo

nohablo

[quo]*Quote from * Mariposa *subir* = to rise, ascend. But I keep thinking of SUBway, to go down [/quo] ¡Yo tambien! Aun en español, subtitulo = subtitle (which goes BELOW)
Mark3

Mark3

Hola, Primer, el palabra "qué" Numere dos, el palabra "como", El problema para mí simplemente es que cuando yo pienso que yo entiendo, ellos parecen usar el como en lugar del "qué" Continúe aprendiendo amigos
Mariposa

Mariposa

[quo]*Quote from * Mark Hola, El problema para mí simplemente es que cuando yo pienso que yo entiendo, ellos parecen usar el como en lugar del "qué" [/quo] ¿Puedes darnos un ejemplo?
Mark3

Mark3

Sí, este ejemplo es de " Rocket Spanish Interactive 2.4 at approximately 18:29 into the lesson" ¿Cómo? Repita por favor. This is a quote from Amy: "When you don't understand what someone has told you, and you want to say, What? What did you say? You can ask ¿Cómo? Don't use qué." From what I can gather, it is used in lieu of "I beg your pardon". Kind of like a more polite "what"
nohablo

nohablo

[quo]*Quote from * Mark This is a quote from Amy: "When you don't understand what someone has told you, and you want to say, What? What did you say? You can ask ¿Cómo? Don't use qué." [/quo] I think cómo there means something like "how's that?" (with a rising intonation on "that") or "come again?" in the sense of "say that again." I think "how's that?" used to be a more common expression in (American) English than it is now.
Mark3

Mark3

Hola Nohablo, Gracias. Creo que usted puede ser correcto. Estoy esperando que Amy clarificará esto posiblemente para nosotros. Vaya con Dios, mi amigo
nailteach

nailteach

Mariposa wrote (in part) [quo]*Quote:* salir = exit, leave[/quo] I associate "salir" with sailor, as a sailor is always leaving.

There is a huge difference in Spanish between asking *¿Cómo?* and *¿Qué?* Use *¿Cómo?* when you don't understand what someone said, or can't believe what someone said. For example, let's say that your friend just told you that Juanita ran away with the baker's son. Your reaction might be, * ¿Cómo? No lo puedo creer. * _What? I can't believe it._ I tend to think of *¿qué?* as referring to physical things. For example, your friend says that she found that thing of yours in the laundry, and you're like, "What?" (wanting to know what thing she found), you'll probably use the phrase, *¿Qué cosa? * Literally, _what thing?_ Last but not least, you can use *cómo *and *qué *together. For example, you might tell your friend, "I want a better way of learning Spanish." Your friend might answer, "Like what?" *¿Cómo qué?* _Like what?_
Mark3

Mark3

Dos cosas. Primero: Yo sé que Juanita, y yo sentimos compasión por el hijo del panadero. :twisted: Segundo: Gracias Amy. Eso lo clarificó perfectamente para mí.

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