Forum Introducing myself as a new learner

Introducing myself as a new learner

Helen-R12

Helen-R12

My name is Helen and I thought I'd say ‘Hi’ to everyone learning the French language through Rocket French too. I'm enjoying the bite-size lessons though find the pronunications tricky and remembering spelling a bit of a challenge but it's nice when we get it right isn't it. 

I find the leader board helps too in monitoring progress and feeling part of a class with others.

Actually, I'm Australian and been ‘stuck’ in France for over 2 years thanks to Covid. I'm living in a small rural hamlet and been practicing basic French on neighbours who have been polite in hiding their giggles. It's good to learn through Rocket French too because if I'm picking up a rural accent equivalent to a Somerset farmer at least there's a chance of ironing it out. Not that there's anything wrong with having an accent at all, it's just a matter of being understood isn't it, Helen

sebongela

sebongela

Hi HelenR12

Yes, pronunciation always tricky. I do envy you being in a local situation though, even though it is out of your control. I am learning Italian and German. I live on Vabcouver Island, but have been to Australia a few times. Lived in Singapore and Brunei for 15 years and had many Australian friends. You made me smile, neighbours giggling at your French. Many years ago in Mozambique there was a missionary. His Portuguese was not great. Instead of saying “Moses remove your shoes, you are standing on holy ground, he sais, Moses remove your pants yuou are standing on holy ground."

I speak Portuguese as lived in Mozambique as a child (Am South African) and have made many a faux pas and I sometimes make a hash of the grammar, but I am not shy to speak it and that helps. Can't say I feel as confident in my German and Italian.

Happy learning

Sebongela

RobertC106

RobertC106

Lucky you, to be stuck in a rural hamlet in France among polite neighbors. You're living my daydream.

 

sebongela

sebongela

Hi RobertC106

My that sounds dire. I also live in a smallish town with polite and good neighbours.

RobertC106

RobertC106

I didn't mean to suggest that there's anything wrong with my neighbors/neighborhood in NM, sebongela. I'm actually very fortunate in that regard. However, I was very much looking forward to getting back to France again (and again) last year, as well as, (by some strange coincidence) getting back to the Pacific NW, where I've vacationed several times in the distant past. So, I'm actually quite a bit more familiar with the small towns on Vancouver Island, although my experiences in rural/urban France (and Italy) are much more recent.

 

Anyway, I find the idea of residing in rural France, a fast train ride away from the city, very intriguing, although it goes without saying that Helen's circumstances are probably far from ideal. If you don't mind my asking, Helen, in what part of France are you ‘stuck’?

 

Robert

sebongela

sebongela

Hi RobertC1056

I miss travelling and can't wait to be able to explore more of the world. I am glad to hear that your neighbourhood is not a bad place to be. I assume NM is New Mexico. At the moment some warmer weather would be lovely. We are sitting at minus 12 at the moment. Unusually cold. Have been to Phoenix in December and swam and sat in warm sun, although the nights were chilly. Do you speak Spanish? I find Spanish quite confusing due to my Portuguese. So have avoided learning Spanish, but it on my list. Have just started Swedish, very different to anything I have dabbles in before

Happy learning

Sebongela

RobertC106

RobertC106

I majored in Spanish as an undergrad at UNM, but being from PA originally and not having much of a study ethic at that age, I was no match for what seemed to me to be entire classrooms full of native speakers. I changed courses of study after 3 years and never looked back. So, I know a fair amount of Spanish, but I definitely do not ‘speak’ Spanish - just enough to occasionally interfere with my French processing. I've never known as much Spanish as I now know French, and, so far as I can remember, I never liked Spanish as much as I like French. More importantly, after all the people that I've met through work and travel from all over the world that speak perfect English, I'm thoroughly ashamed for not having a command of a second language. So, I take it very seriously now.

 

Robert

 

Helen-R12

Helen-R12

Hello RobertC106

I am in SW central France between Perigueux, Bordeaux & Limoges, in the Dordogne, in a tiny rural hamlet.

Although ‘stuck’ I don't feel quagmired in either frustration or isloation, rather, making the most of the comparitively strange circumstances. Usually I am across the NW part of Australia above huge horizons, land and sea-scapes. This is certainly different, being immersed in forests and fields and seemingly rapid changing of seasons. I love the way locals eat locally, share foods grown or caught, given or bought. Eating is a huge thing, much to my delight. I am amazed at how locals can tell the difference between meats and cheeses produced at high level such as à côté de Pyrenees compared to here, just 300 meters above sea level. People are kind and I'd like to be able to speak more freely in French as I know French people love to see us foreigners at least try. 

Where are you?    HelenR12

sebongela

sebongela

Hi Helen-R12 and RobertC106

Your hamlet in France sounds lovely and very different to Australia, a really beautiful country too, the beaches and mountains remind me of South Africa. Have been in Canada for We years, love the changing seasons, mountains and forests. Lived in Singapore and Brunei for many years and being close to the equator there was very little change season wise. 

Robert have also decided to take language serious. Have studied various languages on and off, but at the beginning of Covid purchased my first language course through Rocket. Was a great motivator having paid for something. 

I get what you say about Europe and the way many speak several languages, it is impressive and humbling. I am determined to get there eventually

Not sure if you are familiar with Coffee Break languages. You can pay for courses, but their reading club and podcasts are all free. Only listening, but they are helpful. I have got the premium version of Swedish, as Rocket doesn't have that. That one I am taking very slowly, as very different to any language I have studied.

Sebongela

RobertC106

RobertC106

Helen, I can't imagine what an adventure this must be for you. It would be interesting, and almost certainly enviable, at most any other point in time, but this endless plague is surely casting everything in a different light. I hope you're keeping a journal since it must fascinating how you happen to be there, what it is you've been doing there, how this health crisis has been impacting life in rural France, etc. I'm sure my train from Paris to the Pyrénées passed through your area a couple of years ago, but that would be all that I know of it.

 

I left the forests, rolling hills and rapidly changing seasons of Pennsylvania for California many years ago, had a flat tire with no spare in central New Mexico, and here I sit, in the high desert at 1600 metres, with the mountains on the edge of town looming 3300 meters. I barely endured the culture shock for the first few years until I learned to appreciate being able to indulge myself in a variety of outdoor activities nearly every day of the year. Unfortunately, the climate will not allow for much more drought without us all drying up and blowing away.

 

Thanks for the tip on the Coffee Break podcasts, Sebongela. I'm checking those out.

 

Robert

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