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credo di aver paura

sebongela

sebongela

Mamma mia e troppo

Wow ChrisM41, you were right, level 2 is one big grammar festival.

I think I am going to go through the grammar first. 

Maybe not as daunting as I think it is going to be. Hopefully or wishful thinking at any rate

ChrisM108

ChrisM108

Hi sebongela.   Now that you've had some time with level 2 grammar, how are you finding it?  It's actually got me over my loathing of grammar, which is really saying something, given how many years I've been wrestling with it in my language learning.   I think it was the sheer amount of grammar that immersed me in that aspect, and the step-by-step process Rocket takes that made me realise the benefits of it.  I actually enjoy learning that aspect now, because it's like building a mental puzzle that gradually makes more and more sense of Italian.

I'm English, but went to grade school and high school in Los Angeles.  One of my ex-classmates now lives near Seattle, and has been saying how incredibly hot the northwest is, due to the heat dome.  How are you finnding it?

Ciao, Chris

sebongela

sebongela

Hi ChrisM108 

I have lived in Canada for almost 13 years and it is the first time have felt the heat. Lived in Singapore, Brunei and was raised on a sub tropical farm in South Africa, and this felt a bit extreme. Our houses are built to retain heat and so it has been quite a challenge to dissipate it. Has been headline news for days and it is all everyone can talk about. Makes me laugh

Have stayed indoors, no gardening and concentrated on language. Been fun. I am spending more time on other sources, reverted to book learning, listening and then the grammar. Going slowly, but I will get there. 

Yesterday the forum was down, but wanted to ask you how you tackle the big grammar chapters. Eg. Mancare and piacere. Did you tackle one section or did you do both simultaneously? I am enjoying the “buondi” newsletter an interesting take on language. Love the slow news, get the general gist, but many gaps still. Still encouraging though as a year ago would have understood niente.

A presto

Sebongela

ChrisM108

ChrisM108

I take them one at a time, especially due to the huge content of each topic.  I initially look at the flashcards to see how many items there are to get a context; 40 is ok, 70+ is a ‘you’ve got to be joking' moment.  Basically though, I find it necessary to go through the recorded phrases/sentences time after time, to drum in the difficult ones until I can remember them.  Repetition is key to retaining new vocabulary and grammar. (Web search “spaced repetition system language learning”.  It's core to a lot of science behind memory and learning, especially with languages.). Even then I go back to a previous lesson X weeks later, and realise how much I need to revise, which is all part of spaced repetition.  As an example, take “grazie”.  Everyone learning Italian knows that.  It's easily placed in long-term memory.  More difficult things need more spaced repetition.

The good news?  This is all excellent brain training.  CAT scans of brains have shown brain mass growing in just one year as brain plasticity allows it to increase to accommodate a new language.  It's amazing stuff, and partly why - aside from the joy of learning languages - it is so beneficial.

On a more benefit: I just did a lesson on another piece of software, and because I am tired from a late night, couldn't be bothered thinking about it.  I blitzed it.  It showed me that over-thinking is often counterproductive, and for me, was more proof that this stuff eventually sinks in and becomes second nature.  Otherwise, no-one would ever be able to converse in a second language, would they?!

Chris

sebongela

sebongela

Hi ChrisM108 

Once again, thank you. I enjoy your take on things and it reinforces that I am on the right track. I go back and revise regularly too. 

As I said a bit ago introduced German into the mix. Did German at school and have dabbled in it from time to time. Had a complete brain freeze moment when I started. Was so foreign, my brain could almost only think “Italian”. Have to confess had a bit of a panic. Took me a month to start to feel comfortable and memory has been coming back in leaps and bounds. Have experienced the same thing with Portuguese and Afrikaans. When I used to go back to SA took me a day or to to feel comfortable conversing. Our neighbours are Afrikaans, so practice with them. As for Portuguese will have to visit Portugal, as all the relatives have left Africa.

 

Was very interested to see CEHartman's article on her auditory neurologist. I believe if one speaks, or if you are learning a language, should you have a stroke that certain functions come back more quickly. 

 

 

Good reason to keep on learning even if it is grammar. I quite enjoy it really, just find those glilo etc like tongue twisters. 

Ciao Sebongela

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