Hablaba

Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

From Premium Plus -Lesson 12.5 Nature and Conservation Hablaba y hablaba y hablaba con ella hasta que Mario y yo nos moríamos de cansancio She talked and talked and talked with her until Mario and I were dying of tiredness 1. I noticed when Mauricio was pronouncing hablaba y hablaba y hablaba- sounded like yablaba instead of y hablaba with the silent h 2. She talked and talked and talked with her. Who is she and who is her? 3. Dying of tiredness. Should it be more like "talked to death", not literally of course. I assume that's Mario and Mauricio.
Steven-W15

Steven-W15

1. One word flows into the other. American English is the absolute worst for this. Who says "Would you like to go and eat?" No, one word: "Wannagoeat?" 2. Carmen and Clarisa. 3. Yes, Mario and Mauricio. Actually, "talked to the death" would imply to me in this context that the two women were "talking to death" Mario and Mauricio. Rather it was Carmen and Clarisa who were going on and on by themselves. I think "dying of tiredness" could be translated a bit better though - that sounds a bit off to me.
Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Thanks for the comments. I always appreciate it. The difference between "wannagoeat" and Yablada, yablada is the former still could be understood while yablada cannot. This was in the write it section. I keep playing it again and again so to just memorize it. Maybe I should check it if there is a word called yablada.
oscar-lake

oscar-lake

Steven's comment about words running together is good. Another example is saying the number 35. It is actually treinta y cinco but when said by a native sounds more like trein tay cinco all run together. The y doesn't sound like a separate word.
Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

There is no yablada.
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

I also think the point about words running together is good. That along with regional accents might explain what we are hearing. Another thing to think about is that sometimes sounds are changed to make the sentence flow better. For instance we say "se lo di a ella" rather than "le lo di a ella" (I gave it to her).
the-hefay

the-hefay

Aurora, there also is no "wanna" in English, but it is used all the time for "want to." gonna = going to In fact a lot of "ing" words in English have the "g" dropped when spoken by sloppy enunciators, but when writing it is always included, (except for some written conversation forms.) When words are spoken quickly by a native speaker they run together, many times making words/sounds or leaving them out.

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