Yo no me pongo eso

Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Curious expression. This came up several times in a video I was watching. The Google translation came up as:
"I don't get it." 

Is that the correct translation? 
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

Well, Bing translator returned, "I me not to put that." A literal if useless translation.

It seems that poner takes on a great many meanings, as well as idiomatic uses, so I think you are pretty close.
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

The literal translation would be "I don't put me" but I would guess that it really means "I don't get it" as you suggest.  The English translation doesn't make a lot of sense literally either...what are we not getting?  Usually we get some physical object.
Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Hola amigos!

In Mexican Spanish we use the verb 'poner' very similar to the english verb 'to wear' (as in clothing). In this context, "Yo no me pongo eso" translastes to "I am not wearing that!", but since I don't have the proper context, it could mean many other things.

Me pongo also means "to put myself (in)", but since the sentence ends with "eso" (that) it is not used in this form.

"Don't wear that" (No te pongas eso)

I hope this helps!
Saludos

 
Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Thanks all. This phrase was repeated a bunch of times in the video but the meaning didn't jump out at me. I will try to make a note of the context when I post these kinds of questions in the future. 
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

This morning I said it to the Peruana I meet with once a week, with no context, just asked her what it meant to her. She immediately said, "I'm not wearing that," just as Cristian said.
ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola a todos,

There is a new show on Univisión called Me pongo de pie which I think translates as "I stand" or something like that. Perhaps Cristian or Marie could explain the usage of poner in this case. The show is a singing competition where parents duet with their kids.

Saludos,

Ricardo
Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Hola Rich!,

Como estás?

Yes, me pongo de pie almost translates to "I put myself on foot", of course, literal translation to english sounds a little bit funny, but indeed it means "I stand (on my feet)".

So the me pongo here means...I put myself..."up" or "on my feet" or "standing" hehehe....I know you get the idea!.

Ponte en mi lugar or me pongo en tu lugar are other phrases that use poner and they mean, "put yourself in my place/position" and "I put myself in your place/position"...or as we also say ...en mis zapatos (in my shoes) .You might use it as  "walk a mile in my shoes"...

Saludos

 
ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola Cristian,

Estoy bien y espero que estés bien tambien. Muchísimas gracias por tu respuesta. Ya veo.

Saludos,

Ricardo

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