hace calor

AnthonyLouis

AnthonyLouis

In lession 3.3 it sounds like Mauricio is saying "hace muchA calor" rather than "hace muchO calor". Am I hearing the lesson corectly? Tony

Mauricio and I had a HUGE discussion about this. According to the dictionary, "calor" is masculine. However, Mauricio says that, "Hace mucho calor," sounds "gringo" to his ears. He says that they always say, "Hace mucha calor." Check out this discussion on WordReference.com __http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1625__ You'll notice that even among native Spanish speakers, some talk about "un calor" and others talk about "una calor." If anyone else has a notion WHY this is, please write in!
AnthonyLouis

AnthonyLouis

The Oxford Dictionary has the following entry for calor: (Meteo) heat; con este calor no dan ganas de trabajar you don’t feel like working in this heat; hoy hace calor it’s hot today; hacía un calor agobiante the heat was stifling o suffocating; hace un calorcillo agradable it’s pleasantly warm
AnthonyLouis

AnthonyLouis

I asked a friend from Peru about the hace calor expression. He replied "la gente en sudamerica dice mucho calor or mucha calor Both are in use and interchangeable according to my Peruvian friend.
taalibeen

taalibeen

I asked my girlfriend, who is Puerto Rican, about this. She said that she hears it said both ways, but that she personally usually says hace muchA calor.
AnthonyLouis

AnthonyLouis

I asked a Spanish teacher who is a native Colombian. She said that the correct grammar is to say "mucho calor" but that people sometimes do say "mucha calor." She compared it to the English expressions "He ain't here" and "Aren't I?" which are gramatically incorrect but commonly used in everyday English. (It should be "he isn't here" and "Am I not?").

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