Forum Rocket German German Grammar Difference between Wie heiBen Sie and Wie ist Ihr Name

Difference between Wie heiBen Sie and Wie ist Ihr Name

ahmarBehzad--

ahmarBehzad--

Hello, Dear Sir, What is the difference between the following questions? Wie ist Ihr Name? Wie heiBen Sie? I am using "B" instead of "eszett" because my keyboard does not have the word "eszett".
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

They are generally both translated exactly the same, i.e. "What is your name?" The verb heissen means "to be named" or "to be called" so a more literal translation would be "What are you called?" or "What are you named?" but that's not normally how we ask the question in English. Umm, what happened to the little German keyboard popup? I don't have it anymore.
ahmarBehzad--

ahmarBehzad--

Thank you very much Sir! Best Regards, ahmar
ahmarBehzad--

ahmarBehzad--

Thanks a lot Sir! Your comment, really helpful! Regards, Ahmar
Pam-S

Pam-S

If you have any version of Windows you can load German and then switch between English (or whatever your preferred language is) and German. Just go to Control Panel, then Region and Languages. There's a tab to set keyboard preferences. Once you have added German, you can use Left Alt and Right Shift to toggle between the 2. Hold the left alt down and hit the right shift key to toggle. You can also use the Windows onscreen keyboard to show you where the German letters are on the keyboard until you memorize it. For me, toggling the keyboard is easier and faster than the pop-up german keyboard.
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Thanks Pam. I knew it was possible but never tried it before. That was helpful.Testing: öäüß
Richard-M122

Richard-M122

Regarding the original question, I consider "Wie Heissen Sie" as a little more formal. Also have not tried the keyboard trick, but will.
bikeophile

bikeophile

That's how I do it too, Pam. It is soooo much easier than the pop-up keyboard dreading every umlaut and esset. I find that I'm actually learning to type very well with the German keyboard and sometimes lapse into it even when typing with the regular English keyboard (y's, z's, and punctuation marks are on different keys).
Honest Tom S

Honest Tom S

You can press Alt + number pad keys to get Umlaut and ss when using American Key boards. 132 to get ä 148 ö 129 ü 225 ß 142 Ä 153 Ö 154 Ü 128 Ç for Euro Sign
Honest Tom S

Honest Tom S

You can also use Alt + number pad keys to get Umlaut and ss when using American Key boards. 132 to get ä 148 ö 129 ü 225 ß 142 Ä 153 Ö 154 Ü 128 Ç for Euro Sign
Richard-M122

Richard-M122

Tommy, thanks. This works well on my windows 8. I'm shocked! I printed it and taped it on my monitor. Ich wüenche einen schönste tag.
Honest Tom S

Honest Tom S

Sie sind willkommen; Ich wünsche Ihnen auch einen schönen Tag.
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Hi guys, I'm just a student like you, but I'm pretty sure "willkommen" is rarely if ever used as a response to thank you. For one thing, I never heard it said as a response to my "dankes" when I was in Germany (just a couple of times.) It also seems to be confirmed by at least one native speaker I found in a search on line. Here is his response: You can use "Bitte", "Bitteschön", "Gern geschehen" or "Nichts zu danken". "Bitte" and "Bitteschön" are almost equal, but bitteschön is a bit more polite. You can pretty much always use them but they are mostly used for very small favors. Bitte and bitteschön can also be used like "here you go", like when you hand something to someone. "Gern geschehen" and "Nichts zu danken" would be used if someone thanks you for a larger favor like when you gave them a present or explained how to get somewhere or things like that. But in that context you could also use bitte or bitteschön The only thing that might sound weird would be if you are holding a door open for someone or sitting at the breakfast table and pass the butter to someone and then say "Nihcts zu danken". It's not wrong, it's just a bit too much. Source: me (I'm German)
Marvin-W

Marvin-W

I don't know about Mac's as mine is a PC but here is what I can do. Maybe it will help. Go to control panel and in upper right corner, search for "language" Go to left and and you will see an option for languages; click on that and it will bring up "add a language. If you click on that, it will bring up a window with a multitude of languages. Pick German (or what ever language you want) and then save it. Then go to bottom of your screen to the task bar. On the right side you will see a small square with "EN". click on that and pick option of "DE". To then find them on the keyboard as follows" ß essett is the dash key next to the number 0 kez ü is the bracket Symbol next to the letter P ö is the letter to the right of the letter L, and ä is a Quote Symbol to the left of the enter kez Be Aware that whle in the German mode, the letters Z and y are reversed. Hope that helps.
Honest Tom S

Honest Tom S

Thank Bryon for pointing out my misinterpretation of the word You are welcome. I see now how "willkommen" is use like " Welcome to my home".
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Nichts zu danken! We are here to help each other.

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