Ich muss...nicht...

Peter--252

Hi, in lesson 7.7 there is the phrase "Ich muss heute nicht zur Arbeit gehen." which translates to "I don't have to go to work today".
Now if I hadn't seen the English trans, I would have read it as "I must not go to work today."
The meanings are different in English of course, the latter being a kind of imperative.
Would I be correct in thinking that the correct German for the 2nd English sentence is
"Ich darf heute nicht zur Arbeit gehen" ?

Thanks, Peter.

Honest Tom S

"Ich muss heute nicht zur Arbeit gehen. I must not go to work today translates: I don't have to go to work today is correct. Ich darf heute nicht zur Arbeit gehen  Means " you may not go to work today mean's you are not allowed to go. The word "Darf"means "May means permitted or "darf nicht" which means you may not  or not allowed to do something.

 

Peter--252

Hi Tom, thanks for the reply.
Actually after re-reading the full lesson & doing all the exercises it became a bit clearer!

Byron-K21

Also, the German way of signifying that something is required is to use must (mussen) versus "have to" as we so frequently say in English.  For example, key in "I have to go" in a translator and it will translate as "Ich muss gehen".

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