Subordinate clause rules

Byron-K21

Byron-K21

"Weil" and "denn" both mean "because", right? Yet it seems "weil" makes a clause follow the subordinate clause rules and "denn" does not. I'm refering to "Nein, das ist zu teuer, denn sie kommen mit ihren drei Kindern." in lesson 11. Yet, I think if it had been "weil" then it would have been "Nein, das ist zu teuer, weil sie mit ihren drei Kindern kommen." I realize English has a ton of crazy exceptions so I'm trying not to get bummed about it, but I am a little. I guess I haven't really asked my question. OK, here it is. Are those conjunction words in the grammar lesson the only words that apply to the subordinate clause rule?
Paul-Weber

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, "Nein, das ist zu teuer, weil sie mit ihren drei Kindern kommen." is correct. There are a lot more subordinating conjunctions. I listed more up for you. Da - as/since Da ich heut nicht genug Zeit habe, habe ich meinen Termin auf morgen verschoben. Damit - so that Lass uns morgen treffen, damit ich mir mehr Zeit für dich nehmen kann. indem - while Ich nehme ab, indem ich Kalorien zähle. falls - in case Ruf im Büro an, falls ich zu Hause nicht rangehe. ehe - before Ehe ich die einlade, sag ich die Feier lieber ab. Seit - since Seit ich weniger Fastfood esse, hab ich mehr Energie. Solange - so long as Ich werde schwimmen gehen, solange ich kann. sobald - as soon as ich rufe an, sobald ich Empfang habe. obwohl / obschon / obgleich- although Ich bin müde, obwohl ich lange geschlafen habe. The interrogative words: wann, wer, wie, wo, usw.) can also be used as subordinating conjunctions. Example: Du wirkst wütend, wie du so dastehst. Hope that helps! Let me know if you need the sentences translated as well. Gruß Paul
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Hi Paul, I didn't state my question very clearly. The sentence below in lesson 11 appeared to me to be incorrect because it didn't follow the rule for subordinate clauses. I thought the verb kommen should have been at the end. However, perhaps "denn" isn't a conjunction word although it appears to be used that way. "Nein, das ist zu teuer, denn sie kommen mit ihren drei Kindern." Your examples are helpful and I understand them. I just don't understand why "denn" doesn't follow the rule as well. thanks, Byron
Shannon-S

Shannon-S

Hallo Paul When I write emails or casual notes to my siblings or friends in English, I can use sentence fragments or punctuation to either finish up an on-going thought or to make a comment on what I'm saying. For example I have a mixed breed dog.....Great Pyrenees and Golden Retriever. OR My dog is Great Pyrenees/Golden Retriever. OR It was cold out today but my dog (wouldn't you know it?) insisted on going swimming. Is it possible to do this in the German language? Alles Gute Shannon
Paul-Weber

Paul-Weber

Hi Shannon, It is possible in German and you would be understood. It's all about getting a feel for it so that people who read your German sentences don't think it is a lack of your language skills. 'Ich habe einen Hund, eine Mischrasse...Great Pyrenees und Golden Retriever.' - A complete sentence would be 'Ich habe einen Hund, eine Mischrasse aus Great Pyrenees und Golden Retriever.' Mein Hund ist halb Great Pyrenees, halb Golden Retriever. Heute war es kalt aber mein Hund (wer hätte es gedacht) bestand aufs schwimmen gehen. Do you mean sentences like this one: 'Ich will schon hingehen. Es ist nur...nehmen wir an es regnet, ich hätte keine jacke.' The term 'es ist nur...' is used quite offen. Cheers Paul
Shannon-S

Shannon-S

Thank you, Paul I was just curious to know if it's acceptable to use sentence fragments in German. It's nothing I'm about to do In German until I get a better grasp of complete and proper sentence structure! As it is, I'm cautious about who I use it with in the English language. :) Shannon

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