Verb Order in sentence

Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Hi Paul, Just when I think i'm understanding the rules for order, I see something that seems like it doesn't follow the rules. I'm refering to the following phrase in lesson 12.1 which seems like it is asking a question instead of making a statement. Can you explain that please? Naja, kann man nichts machen. Well, nothing we can do. thanks and regards, Byron
Paul-Weber

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, Yes, that is a specific exception with "kann" used in spoken German were it is quite common to shorten sentences up. The sentence is a short version of "Naja, da kann man nichts machen." "Da" replaces the noun. It is one a few cases were a sentence with the structure of a question is used as a statement. Also some command sentences in German can be used as question too depending of verb is used in the infinitive form. Examples: "Nehmen sie das Zimmer!"-"Take the room!" "Nehmen sie das Zimmer?"-"Are you taking the room?" You will know by the question mark or in spoken language by the melody whether it's a question or not. I hope it helps! Paul P.S.: I like that you are so passionate about the German language.
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Hi Paul, Yes, that makes it clear. Of course, I realize questions should have question marks, but occasionally there are mistakes and I thought this was either a mistake or something I didn't understand, which as you pointed out was exactly the case. Subject "da" is understood but not explicitly stated. We do that in English too although I can't think of a good example right now. Thank you. I am passionate about learning. I'm keeping poor Margaret busy and probably working overtime. Please see that she gets a promotion. She deserves it. regards, Byron P.S. I emailed Margaret a picture of my dog on the treadmill. It didn't get rejected so she should have it.
Paul-Weber

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, I am glad I could help you. The advantage of the forum is that other learners can benefit from your question by reading the answers. The search option is a great way to see if the topic you are interested in has been already discussed in the forum or in a lesson. Liebe Grüße Paul
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Thanks again Paul. Did you see my earlier question on personal pronouns? That one really has me puzzled. The lesson appears to have inconsistent references to "Koffer" i.e. "er" amd "es". Support says they are correct and while I accept that, I don't understand why. Viele Grüße, Byron
Paul-Weber

Paul-Weber

Hi Byron, I had a look in the dialog and you are right, it is inconsistent but that happens in spoken language sometimes and Rocket languages is creating dialouges how everyday people speak. Sorry if that caused confusion for you. I wrote you a grammatically consistent version for you to copy in your notes under your lesson. Matthias Ich glaube ich habe meinen Koffer verloren. Ich warte schon seit einer Stunde an dem Fließband, aber es ist nicht da. Sandra Wie sieht Ihr Koffer aus? Können Sie den beschreiben? Matthias Ja, natürlich. Es ist ein großer schwarzer Koffer mit kleinen Rädern. Liebe Grüße Paul P.S.: Margaret showed me the photo of your dog on the treadmill. I know Huskies need to run a lot.
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Hi Paul, Thanks for taking the time to clear that up for me. When I first saw Koffer referenced with “er” I assumed it was the correct usage because Koffer is masculine. Later, when I saw it referenced as “es” I thought that was a typo. We personalize objects in English too, e.g. boats or cars, but typically not suitcases and jackets, so when I saw those inconsistent references, I was confused. I’m totally in agreement with your approach of the lesson plans using common, everyday dialogue, and I expect most of the other students would agree as well. We have a lot of common English expressions, and I don’t mean just street slang, that bend or break the rules of grammar and usage. However, I think you can see how that might confuse beginners, like me, who are struggling to understand the rules and structure. So, I hope you don’t mind if I continue to question, in the forum or though support, the items that strike me as anomalies. Regarding my dog, she is a malamute, not a husky. They look similar but malamutes are much larger. They are the draft horses of the sled dog community and can pull 20 times their weight. Marta, at 106 lbs, is an average sized female. The males get much larger. The sire of her litter, weighed in at 145 lbs. Like huskies, they need a lot of exercise. Shannon, if you contact support, Margaret will forward that picture. Thanks and regards, Byron
Shannon-S

Shannon-S

Thanks Byron! I sent off a message to Margaret this evening. I'm looking forward to seeing the photo!
Shannon-S

Shannon-S

Hi Byron I got the photo of your gorgeous Marta late last night. Thanks for sharing it! I was expecting her to have blue eyes but did some research on Google today and realize my mistake now. :) Shannon
Byron-K21

Byron-K21

Yes, huskies have the blue eyes, another difference besides size. Byron
binti--

binti--

Gerri-C

Gerri-C

I love your German site because it is helping me with the pronunciation. I also love the questions from everyone. Because of this site, my German is improving. Danke. Gerri

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