El Subjunctivo

Dan-H24

Dan-H24

In lesson 15.9, which deals with the subjunctive, is the following statement:

¡Esperemos que tenga buena voz!
translated as
Let's hope that he has a good voice.

I am confused as to why "esperemos" also seems to be conjugated in the present subjunctive. My understanding is that the verb that initiates the subjunctive, in this case esperar, is conjugated in the indicative, and the dependent clause is conjugated in the subjunctive. Am I missing something here or is the sentence written incorrectly?
Gracias,
Dan
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

I agree with you.  I thought something had to trigger the subjunctive.  Maybe it is using the imperative tense, so maybe it is commanding us to hope to he has a good voice.  Google translate suggests this: "hopefully he has a good voice" whereas "esperamos que tenga buena voz" becomes "we hope he has a good voice".
ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola amigos,

I too agree. I think Robert is right in that it's using the imperative imperative, if not. Where is the trigger?
Saludos,

Ricardo
ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola  Dan y Robert,

The more I think about this, the more I hope for an explanation from Marie or Cristian .Great  question Dan ! To allude to the LIghtSpeed subjunctive book, this  is " Re" Mystifying  the subjunctive for me. Robert, if you come across the use of the imperative as  a trigger please let us know.  I'm confused and curious.

Saludos,

Ricardo



 
Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Hola a todos,

- ¡Esperemos que tenga buena voz! Is definitely in the imperative.

You can have an implied subjunctive trigger, such as in the following:
- ¡Viva el rey!

This last phrase may look like the imperative but is really the expression of a wish or desire, short for:
¡Que viva el rey!

Saludos,

Steven
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

Aprecio las contribuciones de todos a mi pregunta. También, me alegro por tú recomendación del libro de Light Speed Spanish, Ricardo. Quiero lo comprar.
Saludos,
Dan
 
Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Wow! You guys are definitely getting very proficient in the Spanish language. I am jealous.
 
marieg-rocket languages

marieg-rocket languages

Hi guys,

"Esperemos" implies a desire as well; and yes, it can be taken as an imperative too, not precisely as a command but as a desire (and desire to what?) A: that he has a good voice (que tenga una buena voz).

I think the confusion is coming for this conjugated verb. If you were to say "esperamos que tenga buena voz" it sounds as you were talking to someone else, but if you use "esperemos" you're talking to the same group of people who desire the same thing.

For example; if Mauricio and Alejandra were talking to you (and you're not part of their group, or you do not necessarily share the same desire), they would tell you: "Esperamos que tenga una buena voz"

If you were part of Mauricio's group and he would like to express a desire that you all share the expression becomes: "Esperemos que tenga una buena voz".

I hope this is not too confusing. Cheers!
 
ricardo-rich

ricardo-rich

Hola Marie,

¡Muchisimas gracias por la explicación! Es muy útil.

Saludos,

Ricardo
Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Hi Marie,

I do understand the explanations after (very) considerable reflection. :-)

But getting back to the original question, the verb form is in the imperative, correct? Don't the following two phrases mean something different in this context?
- Esperemos que...
- Que esperemos que...

Thanks!

Steven

p.s. Two examples that come to mind in the course:
10.5) Ya no hablemos de eso, Now, lets not talk about that! [Imperative, right?]
21.1) ¡Mejor hablemos de usted! Let's talk about you! [Mmm, perhaps less clear]
How about the following. Are the following phrases in order of "directness" (i.e., going from a command to a wish)?
¡Hablemos de usted!
- ¡Mejor hablemos de usted!
Hablamos de usted.
Que hablemos de usted.
 
marieg-rocket languages

marieg-rocket languages

Hi Steven,

Yes, "esperemos" is an imperative; what I meant before is that in this case is not acting as a command but rather as a hope for something, the expression is exhorting to hope he has a good voice.

10.5) Yes, it's an imperative
21.1) ¡Hablemos de usted!
        ¿Por qué no hablamos de usted?
        Quiero que hablemos de usted.

That's the order I would use to go from a command to a wish.

What happens with "Esperar" specifically is that it means not only to wait, but also to hope, believing that something has to happen, especially if it is favorable or positive, so it may be difficult to differentiate between a command, the imperative or a wish hehehe :-S
Steven-W15

Steven-W15

Thanks, Marie!

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