Forum Rocket Spanish Spanish - Grammar ir versus irse: "tengo que ir" versus "tengo que irme"

ir versus irse: "tengo que ir" versus "tengo que irme"

Robert-C7

Robert-C7

I was doing some reading on reflexive verbs and I found a list where the meaning changes when one uses the reflexive form versus the non-reflexive form. This list includes the verb 'ir'. ir = to go irse = to go away, to leave So, "tengo que ir" means "I need to go" while "tengo que irme" means "I need to leave" or "I need to go away". Is this correct? Google Translate thinks both mean "I have to go". Some other example are: aburrir = to bore aburrirse = to be bore dormir = to sleep dormirse = to fall asleep poner = to put ponerse = to put on http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/reflexive2.htm
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

There was another thread on this same subject a few days ago. I think the consensus was that if you use "tengo que ir," you have to provide a destination, as in "tengo que ir al cine." But if you use "tengo que irme," you are simply saying that you have to leave wherever it is that you are; the leaving and not the destination is the important information.
the-hefay

the-hefay

Robert, your explanation of "ir" and "irse" fits perfectly with the question I raised in the thread Dan mentioned. Specifically, Amy used the reflexive because she needed to go away and rest. "Tengo que irme." In the destinos video, Raquel did not use the reflexive because she was going to Madrid. "Tengo que ir a Madrid." Had Raquel used the reflexive then she proabably would have left off the "a Madrid." How's that sound?
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

I also read that a reflexive verb is one where the subject and object of the sentence is the same. Therefore, when we say "tengo que irme", I don't quite see how I am the subject of this sentence. However, perhaps the absence of a destination is sufficient to make me the subject of the sentence. Similarly, when I say "tengo que ir a Madrid", the object of this sentence is "Madrid" and not me so the non-reflexive form must be used.
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

Maybe think of it as "I have to take myself away?" It seems like we English speakers need to put some strange (to us) spins on reflexives to work them out.
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

I just read a little lesson on reflexive verbs that makes them easier to recognize. In essense, if you can add myself, yourself, him/her/itself, ourselves, themselves to the verb and it agrees with the subject, it is reflexive: I bathe (myself) You dress (yourself) He/she/it looks at (him/her/itself) etc. I think this will help me work out whether something is reflexive or not.
the-hefay

the-hefay

Good thoughts Dan.

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