Reflexive

arylexis

arylexis

Tengo una pregunta. Por favor Ayúdame :) Cual Es significa "me siento estupenda" y " se siento estupenda"? Por que mi amigo en Facebook escribió"se siento solo?" En vez de "me siento solo?"
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

A verb is reflexive when the subject and object are the same. In your example, the infinitive is sentirse. "Me siento estupenda" translates to "I feel great." In this case we are describing a feeling as opposed to actually feeling something, e.g. "Siento este animal" = "I feel this animal". Writing "se siento solo" as opposed to "me siento solo" may be a grammatical error. I can't image a Spanish native speaker having grammatical errors in his writing but we English speakers are notorious for bad grammar.
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

I sometimes am confused with sentir and sentar because they both conjugate to "siento". Is it possible that your friend on Facebook was asking you if you were sitting alone. ¿Se siente solo? Perhaps, he incorrectly spelled sentar and was using the correct reflexive pronoun? Am I making any sense here?
jchamb

jchamb

and I thought that I was the only one who confused the two...
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

I wish it were my only confusing verb! Tell me what you think of "echar". My translator gives me 16 uses. Or at least share with us the way you have heard, read, or used it most often! This word comes to mind because recently I came across some vocabulary and it included: "echar los cimientos". This means: to lay the foundation. It was referencing the construction of a cathedral in Seville.
jchamb

jchamb

I have been trying to think of a more confusing verb than "echar", but no luck yet. I guess the most common translation that I've seen is "to throw", but I think it means something like "to move from one place to another" It is used in Rocket Spanish in lesson 18.1 as "echo de menos - I'm homesick". That makes absolutely no sense to me, but it's odd enough that I actually remember it! A strange way to learn, but I guess it worked in that case. Anyway, there seems to be no end to these odd little sayings (as I am sure is also the case for anyone learning English), and I guess I'll just have to memorize them. Just this morning, in lesson 24.2 I ran across "meter ruido" - to make noise. Meter translates as "to put in", and "ruido" is noise, but "to put in noise" just doesn't make much sense. I guess the neighbors were "putting noise into the environment", or something like that. Here is an interesting link for "echar": http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/echar.htm The more I study this, the more I realize how much I don't know about the Spanish language!
arylexis

arylexis

Same here. The more I learn spanish from Rocket Spanish, the more confused I am especially with some of the phrases they use. In fact I am in that lesson, "echar de menos" - homesick or miss :) I don't like how this lady Alejandra speaks so fast in the platinum version for the conversations. I am a little turned off by it. I feel like she's rambling all the words/phrases together. I listen to a lot of spanish soap ops, go to Spanish services and bible study etc. I am able to get the jist of the conversation/topic but with her I just want to cancel my subscription.
arylexis

arylexis

http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/echar.htm Go to this link about "echar" and its usage. There are many ways to use this just one little word like "echar" in Spanish.
jchamb

jchamb

I felt the same way when I started Rocket Platinum, but the good news is that - it gets easier to understand. (and you're not the first to notice that they start talking really fast). Hopefully you will agree after 3 or 4 lessons, and now that I'm getting toward the end I find that when I review stuff from the Premium or Premium Plus lessons it seems that they are speaking REALLLLLLY slow. (I had never before noticed that Amy spoke so slowly, but it sure seems that way now). I think that you will feel the same in time!
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

Just read your recommended link about "echar". Thanks jchamb.
jchamb

jchamb

Since I'm almost at the end of the course, I looked ahead a few lessons in the "Language and Culture" series. The final lesson of the Platinum course (lesson 25.7, Multi-Meaning verbs) covers echar and volver (the only two covered in that lesson). Take a look at that lesson if you have the Platinum course Patrice.
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

I have access to a library edition only of Rocket up to this point. Therefore, I am incredibly grateful that it includes unlimited access to this forum. I learn a lot here.
Dwight-B4

Dwight-B4

GUANTANAMERA Yo soy un hombre sincero De donde crece la palma Y antes de morirme quiero Echar mis versos del alma Above is the verse first of la famosa canción "Guantanamera" where the verb echar is used.
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

I have some fond memories of group singing the refrain of that song. Up to today I did not know any of the words or their translation. I need help here. Without much research I understand the above verse to mean (loosely): I am a sincere man grown from the palm tree and before I die, I want to give (put forth) the heart of my soul ¿Qué te piensa? También, ¿Qué significa guantanamera?
jchamb

jchamb

guantanamera is a woman from Guantánamo, Cuba. The song's author, José Fernández had a relationship with her, and she eventually left him. Here is a link with a little about the song: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guantanamera
Patrice-B

Patrice-B

Gracias de Nuevo jchamb. Muy interesante.

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