Vamos or Vámonos

Rob-B23

Rob-B23

I have heard people use vámonos instead of vamos and have also seen some discussion in other forums online. The other discussions seemed to settle on a preference to use vámonos when leaving a place and vamos when going to a place. Is this correct? Does it vary by country?
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

I think you are right, Rob: vámanos can be used to mean, "let's leave this place," whereas vamos translates more closely, as "let's go," either from a place or to another place." But I suspect the words are used interchangeably at times, too. I have always enjoyed thinking about words, and now that I am learning Spanish I am amused when I hear someone use the word "vamoose." I assume it is a corruption of vamos, and if so, is misused since the speaker is usually telling someone else to leave.
Robert-C7

Robert-C7

I think 'vamonos', which is vamos + nos, has a more command sound to it. I have used it with my kids when I am rushing them off to school. Vamos sounds more like "we are going", and not quite as commanding.
Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Cristian-Montes-de-Oca

Hola! I use "vámonos" in a "command" or imperative form and basically when " leaving a place" . That 'nos' part at the end, has to do with "us" (as in NOSotros). I think they have the same origin, so it is like saying "Let's go (us)". I can't recall and english equivalent. In the case of "vamos" I think it is a little bit easier to explain and can be used in many forms, the most common one being "vamos a..." Let's go to... Vámonos , ya es hora de salir y es viernes! (Let's get the heck out of here, it's time to go and it's friday!!!! Que tengan un buen fin de semana Saludos!
Ava Dawn

Ava Dawn

Diana agrees with Christian. She said vamos has a place to go while vamonos does not have a specific place.
Dan-H24

Dan-H24

I am reading the part of Ernest Hemingway's book "Islands in the Stream" that is set in Cuba. The protagonist is talking to his favorite cat about going into Havana and, in Hemingway's words, "getting his ashes dragged." Hemingway then follows up with what I can only imagine is a Spanish metaphor for the same activity: "Vámanos a limpiar la escopeta." I have to remember this one!

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